131

Book 4

Wherein is provided a further Outline of the Steganographia Modes

And a Plan of the Polygrapia Modes

Table containing a Synopsis of this Book.

 

Real, and takes place by Mode

Simple, trhough Nomenclation, c.2.

Qualified, through a case of Nomenclature, c.2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clothed, through the construction of Real Speech, as Discourse; where it makes a difference whether the Significant Letter of the Word is

The First; and then Preparation takes place through Process, c.3.

Direct by method

More Common, which is further

Simple; see Bk III cc 3,4,5,6

 

Altered, through Deviation, also Bk III c.7

 

Clothed by the Addition of Lines, also Bk III c.7.

 

Oblique; see Bk III c12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inverted; Bk III cc9.11.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Last, c.4

 

Restricted to the Devices of Scattering, Bk III cc 10,,11.

Salient

Gradual

Successive

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fictitious, and , again, takes place, c.7. by Mode

Simple

More Ample

Artificial

 

 

Arbitraty, through the Selection of a key, c.3 of this Book

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

By Ordinary process through method of arrangement, c.5 which is

 

Arbitrarily, through the selection of a Key c6

 

Fortuitously; by means of an Instrument, c6

Simple

Altered

Specially clothed

 

Preparation of Words

(see Table, Bk II in fin)

is, c.1, of words

 

 

Any other indeterminately, when we proceeed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artificially constructed where there was to be considered

Polygraphy,

And thereof

The Name

The Defense of the Author

 

The Formulas, contained??

 

The First, in BkII

The Second, in Bk III

The Third in Bk IV

 

Of Trithemius?s Polygraphia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Formulas of Others constructed as Examples, c.9.

Of Schwenter

Of Porta

Of the Count of Oettingen

 

 

 

 

 

The Seeking of a? Block c10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


133

 

Chapter One

 

On Preparation of Words, as yet generically considered.

 

In the final chapter of Book 3, above, I have established three Modes of secret-making depending on the Superinduction of Non-significant letters, which takes place only through the mediation of Preparation of Words. These are (1) the Preparation of realWords; (2) the Preparation of Fictitious Words; and (3) the Preparation of certain Artificially-Placed Words. In as much as the elucidation of Trithemius?s Steganographia, to which I have designed to devote the whole Third Book, seems fully to have completed the explanation of the first of these Modes, depending on the Preparation of Real Words, my next step would be to advance directly to the other two Modes, were it not the case that there still remain certain considerations belonging to this first Mode which were omitted by Trithemius. Hence I will address myself to the task of once more considering in few words the same first Mode and of again giving in outline a complete scheme of this Preparation of Words, in all its varieties.? First, then, this Fact stands fixed: Preparation of Words is (1) that of Real Words, (2) that of Fictitious Words, and (3) that of Artificially-Placed Words; each class differing, it would seem, from the other two classes.

 

Preparation of Real Words is accomplished by Simple Nomenclation, of by Qualified Nomenclation, or by the construction of Real Speech and Discourse.

 

Of Simple and Qualified Nomenclation I will treat in the second chapter of the present Book. As to composition of Real Speech, this refers to the first letter, to the last letter, or to any letter indeterminately, of a nonsignificant word, that is , a word that contributes both to the secret narrative and to the ordinary narrative, which undergoes disguise. If we have occasion to employ Preparation of Discourse relating to the first letter, we then make use of the direct process, the Oblique process, or the Inverted process. If we use the Direct process, this takes place by what may be called the more common method, by the method restricted to the devices of Scattering, or arbitrarily through the selection of a key. I f it is a question of the more Common method, the Preparation of Words is accomplished in Simple manner, in Altered manner, or in Clothed manner. So far the division of the subject may be carried. Now with regard to the more Common Direct Preparation of Real Discourse and its subordinate Modes, the Simple, the Altered, and the Clothed, this subject has been treated in chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the preceding Book. Also that form of Direct Preparation which is restricted to the devices of Strewing has been accounted for in chapters 10 and 11 of the same Book. That form or Preparation, however, which I have called the Arbitrary Selection of a Key I find has not been taken up; wherefore I shall give some explanation of it in C. 3 of the present Book. After I have completed by treatment of Direct Preparation, my next step will be to consider Oblique Preparation, which is accomplished through Transposition, and Inverted Preparation, which in all respects proceeds by reverse method; and in fact I have already discussed these in part in the same Bk. 3.c.12, as well as in the preceding eleventh chapter. But I must now shorten sail and proceed to the consideration of those Modes wherein the last letter or some letter of the word other than the first and the last, is the Significant letter, as well as to the consideration of the other remaining Modes; and this, as will later appear in the proper place, I shall do in the third and the following chapters if this Book.

 


134

 

Chapter Two

 

On Preparation of Real Words.

Both the Simpler Preparation and Altered or Newly-Qualified Preparation

 

The above distinctions being made, it behooves me to speak first on Nomenclation; as well as to give, in illustration of the same, a special case of Nomenclature. As respects the former, by far the easiest method is to make a collection of words or names which by their first letters, unless here too you wish alternate words or certain scattered words to be Non-significant, form the secret. There are as many variations of the process as there are varieties to the third Principal Mode; see the whole of the preceding Bk. 3. But not much advantage is gained if the Mode is used thus barely, as here indicated. Let the wise cryptographer, therefore, seek t give man outward show of reason to his labor. This may be done in the following or some other way; Let him pretend that he has received instructions to examine a library, and then let him set forth in his letter that he has carried out his instructions and has found that the library contains the following authors; Augustinum, Basilium, Cyprianum, Damascenum, Eusebium, Fabrum, etc. the names having thus, according to the needs of the secret, been selected and set down, he finally states that, if his correspondent wishes these volumes to be purchased, he must send a hundred florins, etc. that the process may not lack an example, I give the one that follows, which contains a device of this sort and is combined with a form of Directs Scattering of the letters of the secret; see, above, . It runs as follows:

 

Lieber Philippe, auf ewre bitte habe ich die bewuste Bibliothec durchgesuchet/und in derselben folgende Juristische Scribenten gefunden: Vigelium; Gailium; Connanum; Heigium; Lycklaman; Jasonem;Usillum; Oldendorpium; Niellium; Sfortian; Oddonem: Lagum: Hieronymum Elenum: Joannem Nevizanum; Gilbertum Regium; Authonium Frabrum; Nicolaum; Eberhardum; Johannem Naevium; Raevardum; Imolam; Codicern Hermogenianum; Ottonem Melandrum: Mynfingerum: Gomefium: Exeam: Nicolaum Sudorium: Egenolphum: Ehernium: Nigrinum; Nicolaum Intrigliolum.? Diese seynd die Juristisohe Bucher/ so noch verhanden: und seynd die andern albereit weggerissen. So ferne euch nuhn diese annehalich seynd/ ist darumb leichtlich su handeln: Wardet es mir aber bey seiten anzudeuten wissen.

 

 

 


135

 

Chapter Three

 

On Preparation of Words such as is clothed in Real Discourse,

considered with reference to the Initial letter.

 

Of this class and Mode the exposition given in the last preceding Book is sufficiently full. And yet there remain a few remarks to be made very briefly, and a few facts that were there omitted come up for insertion here.

 

Dismissing, then, both the direct Preparation which makes use of the more Common method and that which has its progress, as far as the letters of the secret are concerned, restricted to the devices of Strewing already mentioned, I shall in this chapter take up Arbitrary Preparation performed through the selection of a key; which method, as I have said, was omitted by Trithemius.

 

This form of Preparation depends o a key, which, in the first letters of each following Consignificant word, or word contributing to the secret, in such wise that is each case as many as are the points in the alphabet by which the second of the two letters of the key word is removed from the first, by so many places is the Consignificant word removed, after intervening Non-significant words,? from the key word itself. Let us take, for example, the text Hostis retrocessit. This using the alphabet

 

a b c d e f g h I l m n o p q r s t u x,

 

we conceal by this Mode thus; Since, in the first Non-significant word Magnifice, the first two letters are M and A, and A is ten points removed from M, nine Non-significant words must be allowed to intervene, and only then, in the tenth place, is the Consignificant word Hinricus to be written. And since in this word I follows H, no Non-significant word should be inserted, but in the next place must be written the? consignificant word Omnibus. Now if you continue thus, you will have the complete secret formed out of the following scheme of words:

 

?Magnifice Domine; heri ad me venit noster amicus bonus ille Hinricus, omnibus pene vestimentis suppellectilique exutus anesandissimis illis nebulonibus, qui vias nunc ita obsident, ut penelibertas commeandi fuccisa fit. Tempora nunc exulceratilsima sunt, et pejora fiunt indies. Quid agendum? Supremus ni rebus desperatis remedium afferat, de nobis omnibus omnino actum erit. Interia viriliter agamus, nostra faciamus, proximo luccurramus. Ego pro mea tenuitate feci, ut misellus ille itineri se rursus accingere hodie ocyus potuerit, meliori faxit Deus ter Opt: Max: omine, quam cessitante. Ejus quin curam tu suscipias quoque, sane nullus dubito.? Sic ille tamen trepidat anxius, Vale.

 


136

 

To continue, I would advise that you select for key words such words as do not stand at too great a distance from one another. This Mode too may be varied is such wise that, in place of one Consignificant word, you may combine in different ways two or three such words, always, however, confining the key to the first word. And this form, again, may receive further variations of different sorts. So much, then, for this Mode.

 

It remains that I should make a few remarks also on Oblique and Inverted Preparation of Words. The former not only occurs in those Modes which are contained in Trithemius?s Steganographia (Bk. 3.c.12, above), but, further than this, it may occur in general in all the devices of Transposition (Bk. 5. below). But the treatment of this subject belongs properly to the last chapter of Bk. 5.? Only the simple, rude and unadorned form of that Transposition belongs here; as for the other forms, it is enough to have referred to them.

 

Inverted Preparation also is not confined to the Modes treated by Trithemius (Bk. 3.c.c.9.11); it may in general occur as often as do the Direct and Oblique Modes hitherto mentioned. But let us dismiss this subject and advance to the next.

 

 

 

 


137

 

Chapter Four

 

On the same Preparation,

Considered with reference to the Last Letter.

 

With regard to this Mode also there is silence in the preceding Book. Trithemius, perhaps, omitted to consider this method because he saw that it was too difficult and hardly likely to be of practical use, I quite agree with him. Still, to make my treatment of the subject complete, I have thought it best to mention the fact that I have observed that the Englishman Roger Bacon, in his Speculum Alchymiae, has retained both methods of giving information, the method which makes use of the first letter of the word and that which makes use of the last. For, while, by the initial letters of the seven chapters in which he composed his Speculum Alchymiae, the initial letters of the seven following words, namely: In. Verbis, Praesentibus, Invenses, Terminum, Exquisitae, Rei, he expressed the word Jupiter, he at the same time, by the final letters of the same chapters, the letters terminating the seven following final words: projectioniS, debeT, totA, taneN, bitumeN, mutU, aeternuM, expressed the word Stannum. There are also, elsewhere, other examples of this form of Preparation, but I let them pass, as being of little value and little adapted for use.

 


138

 

Chapter Five

 

On the same Preparation,

Considered with reference to Indeterminate Letters of the Word.

 

Such is the process of Composition of Discourse when the initial or the final word is to be written Consignificant; see the whole of Bk. 3, and the present book to this point. Let us now consider the case wherein discourse beneath which lurks a hidden meaning is to be composed of words such that at one time the first, at another time the last, and at still another time an indeterminate letter is Significant. This Mode is accomplished Naturally, under a fixed arrangement of its own; Arbitrarily, through the arrangement of a key; or Fortuitously, through the use of an instrument.

 

The Mode depending on a fixed arrangement of its own is accomplished. Simple, according to a fixed number in each line; according to the diverse methods of Strewing or Scattering (concerning which, see Bk. II.cc.6,7, above); or , finally, with regard to some figure.

 

The Simple Mode is understood to take place when we fix upon these letters to be Significant, namely: in the first line, the 6th, 12th, 18th, 24th, 30th and 36th: in the second line, the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th 25th, 31st and 37th; in the third line, the 4th, 8th, 13th, 17th, 21st, 27th, and 32nd; in the fourth line, the 2nd, 9th, 14th, 19th, 23rd, 29th , 35th, etc

The Altered Mode takes place when, retaining the principle of the Simple Mode, we add thereto either, on the one hand, the device of Scattering or that of Inversion, or, on the other, the disguise of some other method, such as Transposition or the Superinduction of Non-significant Lines, or the like.

 

The Mode Clothed in Figure takes place only by a method involving careful calculation: when, namely, the letters are so distributed that, while the arrangement as a whole preserves perfect structure, the Significant letters form a figure. The art of distributing letters by this method was first undertaken in verse by Publilius Optatianus Porphyrius, in the Panegyricus, written in honor of the Emperor Constantine about 324 A.D. and published not so very long ago, in 1595, namely, at Augsburg, from a manuscript (another similar one to which I have in my possession) of Paul Velser, Patrician of Augsburg. In imitation of Optatianus, Magnentius Hrabanus wrote his work on the Holy Cross.? Hrabanus, if we are to trust John Bale, Script Britann , cent 14, c.40, (2), was a Scotchman by birth; he was at first Abbot of Fulda, and afterwards Archbishop of Mains, flourished about the time of the Emperors Charlemagne and Lewis the Pious, and died 856 A.D. at Mains. It is my belief that it was in imitation of these men that Trithemius, on a more systematic principle and one better fitted for use in secret-making, worked out his system of Steganography; although, as far as use is concerned, if letters distributed here and there and containing a special meaning, were not, in the manuscripts, written in red, and, in the following schemes, included within lines, in this way describing a definite figure, the meaning here would escape observation equally well, or perhaps even better.

 


139

 

But I do not dare to promise that this device will everywhere serve our purpose. For it abounds in difficulties, especially in verse. In prose, I grant, its use is greater and its employment easier, if an agreement is made beforehand in regard to the figures which the distributed letters are to form and if, after the manner of a key, those figures are indicated by points or other signs designed to escape the observation of all readers, even careful readers, except the confidant alone. That the case may not lack an example, especially as the copies to be obtained of the writings of Optatianus and Hrabanus are few, I insert here two poems, the one by Optatianus, the other by Hrabanus. First comes Optatianus?s scheme, together with Optatianus?s explanation of the same.

 

p a u c a q u i d e m c e c i n i f o r s f r i v o l a h i s q o q j u n g a m

l u d i c r a s i o n o s t r a p a n g e t t u a j u s s a c a m o e n a

a m b i i t h a e c p l a u d e n s f e l i c i s n u m i n e p h o e b i

c a l l i o p e p a r t i t a n o v i s s i b i v i n e u l a o u r i s

f l e x i b u s u t p r i m i s d i s c o r d i r e g u l a c u l t u

h i n o a l i a s o n e t a r t e s u p e r p i t h o i a f l e x u s

s i c f a c i e s t o t i e n s o u m o o n f i r m a v e r i t a e s t u s

s i c a n i m u s n e o v i c t u s i n e r s s e d s a u c i u s i r i m

i m p l e r i v a r i a s m e t r i c a e g r a v i o r i s o b a r t e s

t a n d e m n o s s e d e i m e d i t a n t e n v i x l i c e t a e s t u s

r i t e v e l i t m e d i c d u m i n a g m i n e c o l o c a t a s t r i

e f f i g i e m t r o p i d e q u e p a r a n s s e r m o n e l a t e n t o r

d i c e r o n o o m e t u e n s v i n c t o s i c o m n i a a b o r t u

p a n g e r e s e d r u r s u m b a s s u s n u n e p r o d e r o c a r m on

i m p e r a t h i o d o c i l i s m u s a e d e f o n t e m e a b u n t

o r d i n e c a s t a l i c t e x t i p e r n o m i n a v e r s u s

 

Beginning with the first letter of the first verse and following along the squares included by lines, descend to the eighth letter of the eighth verse, and then, turning, reascend, and so continue until you reach the next to the last letter of the same eighth verse; you will then read from these verses the words:

 

Publilius Optatianus Porfirius haec lusi.

 

In like way, beginning with the first letter of the last line, go to the eighth letter of the ninth line, and then, by successive turns, ascend and descend until you reach the next to the last letter of the ninth line, and you read the following heroic verse:

 

Omne genus metri tibi pangens optume Basse

 

Which read backward, becomes a Sotadic:

 

Basse optume pangens tibi metri genus omne.

 

Similarly, these letters: extending from the first letter of the sixth line to the thrid letter of the eighth line, the three letters ?HIC?; from the thirteenth letter of the eighth line to the fifteenth letter of the sixth line, ?VER; thence to the seventeenth letter of the eighth line, ?SU?; then from the twenty-seventh letter of the eighth line to the twenty ninth letter of the sixth line, ?SUA?; thence to the thirty-first letter of the eighth line, ?RI?; then from the thirty-first letter of the ninth line to the twenty-ninth letter of the eleventh line, ?OCO?; thence to the thirdty-seventh letter of the ninth line, ?LO?; then form the seventeenth letter of the ningth line to the fifteenth letter of the eveventh line, ?RED?; thence to the thirteenth letter of the ninth line, ?IS?; then from the third letter of the ninth line to the first letter of the eleventh line, ?PAR?: make the Endecasyllabic verse:

 


 

139

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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140

 

Hic versus vario colore dispar.

 

The verses of hrabanus are these:

 

musacitastudiogaudensnuncdicerenumen

nostracupitparitercarmineetalloquiis

donapatrissummiquelargusreddiditorbi

regisetaltithronisanctatrophacasimul

quaecruxestsacracrucifixinumineplena

ommibusaptabonisstirpsvenerandasatis

hancegopauperegenusinopsenorelaquela

temptavihicfamulussonsdareethocoriar

necmefactapiantquoddignummuneretanto

meforeadhoccredamsicquoqementeprobum

sedmihilargadeibonitasspesmaximavoti

estquaemepromptumlausdabatexhilarans

pauperisetviduaenonsprevitraraminuta

sedtulitipsaprobansarbiteromnitenens

atqueorbedominansqisancitsolusetunus

cunctavenustabonahanclaudebeavitamor

mandatumveterenempeestetlegequibusqe

munerautaptadarenttemplaadhonestadei

parsdeditargentumparsaurimuneraclara

parstribuitgemmasparsqoqetinctadedit

lignaoleumqidampigmentaquecaradedere

multaqmagnadomusmonstratubiquemicans

astaliisetastulerantpilosquecaprarum

necfuerantspretihidonaferendodeohaec

quapropterrogitonummatumdivesutistio

viliacumportemhincspernerenollitonus

ipselicetgazasinmensasconferatamplis

agminibusfultustemplaonerandadeihinc

hisegononmotusconturbornamimpievultu

sedgratulansspeculororesceredonasibi

illequoqueexosauthabeatmeamuneranolo

sedmagisessesciatqualiacunquedeihaec

exprobratipsedeoqidespicitaceregenum

cujusegenushicestcujusetomnishomoest

enqantumtribuotribuitmihijesusamator

sintsuafactapiehiccunctaquehicrapiat

 

The letters enclosed within lines and distributed here and there throughout the space, the first, eighth, fifteenth, twenty-second, twenty ninth, and thirty sixth or or last, letters of the first, eighth, fifteenth, twenty-second, twenty ninth, and thiry sixth or lst, horizontal lines, produce the following word:

 

Magnentius Hrabanus Maurus hoc Opus fecit? (1)

 

 


141

 

Chapter Six

On arbitrary Preparation accomplished by means of a Key;

also on Fortuitous Preparation accomplished by means of an Instrument.

 

The second Principal Mode depends on a key, and in this method the letters must be distributed in accordance with the norm of this key. This norm is the letter itself (see Bk.2.c.8), and, by its numerical position in the alphabet, it shows where the next letter is to be placed. For example, let us have the alphabet

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

k

l

m

n

o

p

q

r

s

t

u

w

x

y

z

 

If the secret be Fuge ocyus, write first the letter ?F.? since ?F? is the sixth letter in the alphabet, the following letter ?U? must be put in the sixth place after this letter; and since ?U? is the twentieth letter in the alphabet, the letter ?G? must be put in the twentieth place after ?U.? From which point you continue in this manner, you may produce from the secret a discourse like the following:

 

?Faustius tibi, mihi certe hihil gratius est tuo reditu, quom spe cityus accelerasti. Ni enim istud factum fuisset, ingens robus tuis damnum, ec.?

 

I should be remarked here that, if the number of the letter is doubled the opportunity for constructing discourse by this method is freer.

 

The third Mode depends on the familiar device of a thin, perforated plate: one or more letters of the secret are written by means of an opening , either wide or narrow, therein, and by the assistance of the same opening, the words are disclosed again to the reader. The method of constructing such an instrument and the Mode of writing therewith are clearly shown by Porta (Bk. 2.c.18), following Cardano and von Glauburg (in his Expositio ad Polygraph. Trithemii), and I will, therefore, add nothing further. See, above. Bk.2.c.9, and, below, Bk.6.cc.10&20, the instruments there described belonging quite properly here.

 

 

 

 


142

 

Chapter Seven

 

On Preparation of Fictitious Words and Discourse

 

It appeared form out classification in the first chapter (of this book) that the second primary Mode of the Superinduction of Non-significant letters was accomplished by the Invention of Fictitious Words.? The principle is this: Write a Significant letter and then attach thereto an Idle, and so proceed with alternate letters. But since this principle is too simple, we must employ the disguise of quasi-discourse, wherin the continuous line of letters is divided into fictitious words. In this way, not only will words be formed consisting of letters, either Significant and Non-significant combined or Non-significant alone, but, the letters being thus grouped into words, variations, on the basis of the letter or of Transference of letters, may be introduced within the general method. Whence may be accepted this general rule: As many as are the Modes by which, in the case of Real Discourse, adjustment of method to material is affected, so many also, and especially is this the case if a word be formed for each letter of the secret, are the Modes by which, in the case of Fictitious Discourse, variations may be brought about. For truth is the rule and the measure of the false, so that there is no need to linger further here over fruitless searching for precepts, It should be understood, however, that the proper method of this Mode is not that of the other Mode, but is a special one, and, in order that this part of the subject may also receive full treatment, I shall now briefly present an explanation of this method. This Mode too is accomplished in three ways: (10 by what may be called a Simple method; (2) by an Ampler method; (3) by a more Artificial method. The Simple method is explained by Trithemius in his General Key in these words:

 

?The third General Mode is this: If you wish, for instance, to write ?Miserere Omnipotens Deus &c.,? you will proceed as follows: You will number all the letters of your sentence, and as many as you have found them to be, into so many groups will you divide the same. If, for instance, you wish to divide them into two groups, you will have for each group of the complete sentence written above, which consists of forty-five letters, (1) twenty two letters, and one letter left over, which you will append to the others at the end; likewise, these letters you will write down, as indicated below, and the process you will be able to vary in many ways.?Amainsiem Raebrueos Ofmanni Uplostrennasi Duenursu?: this line is divided into two groups. In three groups, you will arrange it thus: ?Romefinasine Anralevors Reavona Mitneri Moparo Nutamenonurs?; in four groups, thus: ?Anomiavipolsoro Et Arreanenbars Utedsu Oefumaurnomui &c.? And so we proceed, dividing, up to eight or more groups. After that , we advance, as above, to the process of arranging letters that are in some way significant, is combination with other words introduced between.?

 

Thus much, Trithemius. The Ampler method takes place if to consignificant words are attached others that are Non-significant. As examples may serve all the conjurations of Bk.I. of Trithemius?s Steganographia. The Artificial method takes place when, the letters of the secret being reduced to the form of fictitious words, we arrange the words themselves in two, or even three or four series, and then taking first a word of the first series, place next it a word of the second series, and so proceed, using ? if two series only have been made ? alternate series.

 

 


143

 

As examples of this method, let the laws, or conjurations, prefixed to the Modes contained in the Second Book of Trithemius?s Steganographia serve. Of this class are also the following lines, which I have taken from this same Second Book, near the end:

 

 

Mesari Cosmeniel Archea Sameor Critas (2)???????????????????????????? (pp 158-159)

Dricho Mosayr Usio Noes Veso Tureas

Abrithios Naselian Pyrno Chyboin Ormon

Cervali Mirbevo Lian Savoao Sayr

Rhymaor Cave Japion Inospiel Sasevo Rhaony

Naty Thyrpolian Jonayr Chuleor Nefris

Mistriona Nayr Davosy Tyvamo Turmy

Pleoro Nomeato Turias Bresnae Nasephon

Adion Sayr Catros Thyrosny Aschion Ermy

Otiel Layr Romays Theory Najas Atrevo

Aliar Measco Trisna Useori Jesachor

Bios Pailon Ravemy Seor Astropenason.??? i.e.

 

Omnes Modi hujus Artis, in omnibus variari possunt, in infinitum;

per Transpositionem Literarum ac Verborum, acetiam sine Translatione ulla,

si cui operanti placuerit industrio & bene docto, ac in terminis Latinis copioso.

 

These, then, are the foundations, on which afterwards may be constructed other devices in this general class. Such devices I have everywhere in Bk.9.c.5, in the presentation of the keys which are prefixed to my Modes, sedulously aimed to compass, and I refer the reader to that place.

 

????

 


144

 

Chapter Eight

 

Wherein is contained an Estimate and a Defence of the Term

Polygraphy and of the name of him who originated the same.

 

Having expounded both Direct and Inverted Preparation, I come now to Oblique Preparation, (1) which has been treated by Trithemius in the Polygraphia; see the last chapter of Bk.2. , above. But before I enter upon the real matter of this discussion, I find it proper to introduce two prefatory considerations, - one, having reference to Trithemius, the other, relating to the term.

 

With regard to the term, I mentioned above, in Bk.1.c.2, and in Bk.II.c.10, that, according to the usage of the art, it is understood of that part of the subject alone, which deals with a form of alphabet, prepared beforehand and consisting of complete words, and which shows the method of constructing such an alphabet and of using it. Thus each part of Cryptography has its own special name, and it is not necessary, when we have occasion to talk of or discuss this subject with a pupil or other person, to enter into long circumlocutions. The precedent for this narrower use of the terms was established by Trithemius, who devoted his Polygraphia, almost in its entirety, to the treatment of this part of the subject. I am aware, however, that Trithemius himself used the word in a wider sense and included under it not only that part of the subject to which I have referred, but also the other departments, dealing with Transposition and Substitution of Form. He thus devotes the whole of Bks.5 & 6. To these departments alone. (2) And so, if the reader look with favor upon this narrower use of the word, and, for this sake of greater accuracy, be inclined to follow me therein, I have now said that which I had to say about the term.

 

Let us now consider the author.? Cardano, in his De Rer. Variet., Bk.12.c.61, attacks Trithemius with the greatest bitterness and with a vehemence that ill befits a man of letters, ridiculing, among other things, this whole system of Polygraphy, and proclaiming the author a shameless imposter, if there ever was one, because, forsooth, he chose to put forth his own invention in allegorical disguise. These slanderous charges, idle and inconsiderate pratings that they are, we can clear aside in no more becoming way than by listening to Trithemius himself interpreting his own design. In the Preface to his work on Polygraphy, addressed to Maximilian , most extolled Emporor, he thus begins:? There are, in certain places in the subjoined system of Polygraphy, secrets involved in allegory, to the end that the sense of the inner art, (1) lurking beneath, may not be plain to the intelligence of every man. ?You hear his design, and that he meant this in all seriousness the many protestations which are scattered up and down, throughout the Polygraphia and the several Books of the Steganographia, are proof. The motives for this secrecy were sufficiently important, (2) and they may be easily and clearly understood by any one, from the Preface to the Polygraphia and, above all, from the remarks contained in the Epilogue to the Sixth Book of the Polygraphia. Is there any reason therein that should induce us to call Trithemius the most shameless of mortals? Heaven forbid! With the same breath should we condemn Antiquity, most discreet dispensator of secret wisdom.?? (But that?)

 


145

 

But that our good Trithemius promised not falsely or unreasonably by his system of allegory is easily seen by him who considers not so much what Trithemius wrote regarding the usefulness of his art, as how he wrote. Hence so often does he inculcate the advice, ?that no man should understand him to have promised other than he has promised?; for thus he speaks in the Preface entitled? The Features of this Work of mine.? For the rest, it is without reason that Cardano inveighs against the invention , for the methods of Cryptography are not less useful or less convenient than the Laconian scytalae or the perforated plates? so much praised by him, - to say nothing of the fact that the alphabet of words far surpasses both the plate and the scytale. Hence, Porta, Bk.2.c.19, speaks of the alphabet as of a thing deserving all recognition for its ingenuity, and calls it ?most recondite?. When, however, he takes the author to task for his undue prolixity, he speaks to the point. But shall we for that reason call Trithemius most shameless? Hear the man himself speak: ?It was enough for me to have discovered the principles of the art and t have described the method of writing symbolically, - a method rude and designedly ill-formed. For, that I should put my inventions into shape and polish tem off, I had neither time nor reason.? So Trithemius at the end of the Preface entitled The Features of this Work of mine. Again, in the Pinax, Bk.1.: ?From these (i.e. inventions) any one can advance to still higher methods if he wish. As for me, I have cared not to bring forth in this way higher things to light, etc.? From this, the design of the undertaking and the reason why the author did not care to give his work a final, polished form, might have been perfectly clear to Cardano. In all conscience, when there appeared this new author with this new invention, Cardano should in no mean spirit have recognized the invention as one of superior merit; if the work were not recommended by its form, which usually comes to inventions in the end, it should certainly have been recommended by its becoming fullness and variety of material

 

Thus, in the First Book, Trithemius, carrying out the intention of his work, formed an extensive alphabet. And this would have served his purpose, but the style of writing being always the same, he showed in the Second Book, by constructing another alphabet, that the style could by varied. And yet, even after he had made it evident that the process could be performed in a second language as well as in Latin, he went a step further and presented in the Third Book a Mode of fictitious words. Following which comes the Fourth Book, wherein is set up a new method involving fictitious words, which consists herein, that the process is performed not alone by single words in and through themselves, but also by words through the evidence of the second letter.

 

Cardano, therefore, had no reason for inveighing against Trithemius, unless he were moved by envy, which the Italians, unwilling to bestow honor where it belongs, are ever, more than any other people, quick to feel toward the Germans, famous as these are for their great discoveries. But to the matter in hand.

 


146

 

Chapter Nine

 

On Preparation of Words Artificially constructed.

 

Let us now, coming to the matter in hand, consider the Composition of Words above mentioned. This method is entirely different from the methods previously discussed. For here there is no need, as there was in the case of the former Modes, to labor industriously at collecting words: we have a certain alphabet, ingeniously and skillfully constructed, by young learners of the art, and this we are simply to use, like a storehouse of words. Just herein does the difference between this an the preceding Mode become most apparent. For there free discourse results, while here we are always restricted to the forms of a previously arranged alphabet; see, also, Bk.2.c.10. I have shown above in the Eighth Chapter how our Abbot wrote four Books on this Mode. Porta, Bk.2.c.1, has put these alphabets into the form of an epistle, and he has shown that there is no need of a large collection of alphabets. He includes his own epistle within the limits of sixty words. Schwenter, Bk.5., has a Mode whereby we can write by means of a single alphabet; from one alphabet, he carries this method on through three (in which case sentences always result), four and seven alphabets. Porta?s method is less open to suspicion. If the secret includes more than sixty, or , as in the present chapter, fifty seven, letters, Porta tells us to begin a new epistle. The reader will also observe that, although the alphabets are written in certain set forms and are now for the second time made public property, the secret may nevertheless still be hidden by Transposition of Letters or by some other disguise. I have thought it worth while to insert here from Porta, for the benefit of those who do not change to have Porta?s book at hand, the aforementioned table of alphabets, and to present it as arranged by him, entire with one exception: for the sings which Porta placed at the beginning and end of the alphabet, it has seemed to me better, -the alphabet being designed for epistolary purposed, - to substitute notes and words appropriate to an epistle, at the same time omitting the various signs of interpunctuation.

 

The table is given below, covering several pages.

 


147

 

 

 

1.

 

2.

 

3.

 

4

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

S.

a.

Amico

a.

Vidi

a.

literam

a.

dulois

b.

S.D.

b.

Patri

b.

Aspexi

b.

epistolas

b.

honorate

c.

P.S.D.

c.

Parenti

c.

Percepi

c.

syngraphas

c.

amate

d.

D.S.

d.

Agnato

d.

Habui

d.

paginam

d.

suavis

e.

p.s.d.

e.

Abavo

e.

Natus sum

e.

paginas

e.

lepide

f.

D.S.P.

f.

Domino

f.

Cognovi

f.

literulas

f.

humane

g.

D.P.S.

g.

Fratri

g.

Concepi

g.

schaedulam

g.

probe

h.

P.D.S.

h.

Socero

h.

Perspexi

h.

schaedulas

h.

spectate

i.

S.D.P.

i.

Nepoti ex Sorore

i.

Intellexi

i.

epistolium

i.

dilecte

l.

s.d.p.

l.

Privigno

l.

Sumpsi

l.

tabellam

l.

mangamime

m.

p.d.s.

m.

Socio

m.

Assumpsi

m.

scriptum

m.

jucunde

n.

d.p.s.

n.

Commensali

n.

Percurri

n.

scripturam

n.

magnifice

o.

d.s.p.

o.

Nepoti

o.

Suscepi

o.

chyrographum

o.

ornate

p.

S.P.D.

p.

Compatri

p.

Resumpsi

p.

chartas

p.

honeste

q.

s.p.d

q.

Avo

q.

Prospexi

q.

chartulam

q.

exculte

r.

d.s.

r.

Avunculo

r.

Recepi

r.

chartam

r.

doote

s.

s.d.

s.

Pronepoti

s.

Accepi

s.

epistolam

s.

prudens

t.

s.

t.

Tutori

t.

Perlegi

t.

literas

t.

provide

u.

Ave.

u.

Proavo

u.

Legi

u.

tabellulas

u.

sincere

x.

Salve

x.

Atavo

x.

Respexi

x.

chartulas

x.

manenete

y.

S.p.d.

y.

Curatori

y.

Conspexi

y.

tabellas

y.

ingeniose

z.

S.d

z.

Cognato

z.

Novi

z.

syngrapham

z.

optime

 

 

 

 


148

 

 

 

6.

 

7.

 

8.

 

9.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

et

a.

illustrissime

a.

Fabrici

a.

Porta

b.

atque etiam

b.

familiariesime

b.

Vincenti

b.

Penna

c.

perinde ac

c.

charissime

c.

Baptista

c.

Caracciole

d.

&

d.

amplissime

d.

Federice

d.

Severe

e.

idemque

e.

foelicissime

e.

Jacobe

e.

Leone

f.

ac etiam

f.

splendidissime

f.

Petre

f.

Caraffa

g.

ac

g.

excellentissime

g.

Alfonse

g.

Valla

h.

atque

h.

celeberrime

h.

Francisce

h.

Belle

i.

aque ac

i.

clarissime

i.

Gustave

i.

Severine

l.

atque

l.

munificentissime

l.

Casar

l.

Urse

m.

que

m.

acutissime

m.

Hieronyme

m.

Benigne

n.

q;

n.

gravissime

n.

Pompeje

n.

Capua

o.

&

o.

integerrime

o.

Domine

o.

Poeta

p.

g

p.

benignissime

p.

Scipio

p.

Marate

q.

q.

q.

clementissime

q.

Nicolae

q.

Miline

r.

g

r.

modestissime

r.

Carole

r.

Vanusine

s.

que

s.

eruditissime

s.

Nute

s.

Vicine

t.

atg

t.

solertissime

t.

Alberte

t.

Venete

u.

& simil

u.

morigeratissime

u.

Anthoni

u.

Selene

x.

simul ac

x.

Prastantissime

x.

Alexander

x.

Senensis

y.

ac simul

y.

Gratissime

y.

Johannes

y.

Tarvisie

z.

simul &

z.

amicissime

z.

Ptolomae

z.

Mazzella

 

 

 


149

 

 

 

10.

 

11.

 

12.

 

13.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

pridie calendas

a.

January

a.

Sempronium

a.

tabellionem.

b.

calendis

b.

February

b.

Tiberium

b.

libertinum

c.

octavo idus

c.

Marty

c.

Tullium

c.

servum

d.

sexto idus

d.

Aprilis

d.

Lucium

d.

secretum

e.

quinto idus

e.

May

e.

Liciscam

e.

tabellarium

f.

quarto idus

f.

Juny

f.

Palemonom

f.

clientem.

g.

tertio idus

g.

July

g.

Simeonem

g.

hospitem

h.

pridie nonas

h.

Augusti

h.

Ludovicum

h.

libertum.

i.

quarto calendas

i.

Febr.

i.

Trebatium

i.

manumissum

l.

sexto calendas

l.

Octobris

l.

Petreum

l.

amicum.

m.

septimo calendas

m.

Novembris

m.

Tyronem

m.

vernam

n.

nono calendas

n.

Decembris

n.

Tyburtium

n.

contubernalem

o.

octavo calendas

o.

Quintilis

o.

Theseum

o.

assiduu.

p.

decimo calendas

p.

Sextilis

p.

Artemidoru

p.

delatorem.

q.

undecimo calendas

q.

Septembris

q.

Haly

q.

nuncium

r.

duodecimo calendas

r.

Jul:

r.

Petronium

r.

fidelem

s.

decimo quinto calendas

s.

Jan.

s.

Quirinum

s.

domesticum.

t.

Idibus

t.

Aug.

t.

Sextum

t.

mancipium.

u.

tertio nonas

u.

Mart.

u.

Josephum

u.

missum.

x.

quarto nonas

x.

Apr.

x.

Valerium

x.

intimum

y.

decimo tertio calendas

y.

Ma:

y.

Franconium

y.

conscium.

z.

quinto calendas

z.

Jun:

z.

Pontanum

z.

benevolum.

 

 

 

 


150

 

 

 

14.

 

15.

 

16.

 

17.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

Subito

a.

vidi

a.

rogatum

a.

certe

b.

Cito

b.

inspexi

b.

voluntatem

b.

indubitanter

c.

Extemplo.

c.

intellexi

c.

conceptum

c.

nempe

d.

Statim

d.

agnovi

d.

desiderium

d.

Nimirum

e.

Illico

e.

conspexi

e.

mentem

e.

medius fidius

f.

Continuo

f.

perspexi

f.

intentionem

f.

aedepol

g.

Confestim

g.

accepi

g.

dictum

g.

sane

h.

Mox

h.

hausi

h.

praceptionem

h.

porro

i.

E vestigio

i.

excepi

i.

petitum

i.

plane

l.

Ocyssime

l.

providi

l.

postulatum

l.

profecto

m.

Mature

m.

animadverti

m.

cogitationem

m.

enimvero

n.

Prapropere

n.

novi

n.

affectionem

n.

quidem

o.

Raptim

o.

percepi

o.

propositum

o.

dubio procul

p.

Citius

p.

penetravi

p.

intentum

p.

quippe

q.

Citissime

q.

perpendi

q.

optatum

q.

verum

r.

Velociter

r.

concepi

r.

animum

r.

indubitate

s.

Festine

s.

inveni

s.

deliberationem

s.

pol

t.

Repente

t.

cognovi

t.

jussum

t.

meherele

u.

Celeriter

u.

consideravi

u.

consilium

u.

equidem

x.

Prasto

x.

didici

x.

petitionem

x.

casterum

y.

Inopinato

y.

expendi

y.

praceptum

y.

perpol

z.

Ex improviso

z.

habui

z.

mandatum

z.

clare

 


151

 

 

 

18.

 

19.

 

20.

 

21.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

cupidus

a.

prudenter

a.

obedivi

a.

Dedi

b.

avidus

b.

vigilanter

b.

obtemperavi

b.

Adbibui

c.

optans

c.

sedulo

c.

executioni madavi

c.

Substitui

d.

appetens

d.

provide

d.

ancillatus sum

d.

Largitus sum

e.

exoptans

e.

perfecte

e.

morieratus sum

e.

Permisi

f.

gliscens

f.

deliberate

f.

rem peregi

f.

Prabui

g.

concupiscens

g.

singulariter

g.

rem gessi.

g.

Obtuli

h.

gestiens

h.

alacriter

h.

egi rem.

h.

Pratuli

i.

gratulabundus

i.

bilariter

i.

obsecutus sum

i.

Attuli

l.

anhelans

l.

audacter

l.

adeffectum perduxi

l.

Absolvi

m.

ardens

m.

integre

m.

parui

m.

Solvi

n.

exardens

n.

amice

n.

executus sum.

n.

Retribui

o.

inflammatus

o.

amanter

o.

perfecirem

o.

Consignavi

p.

incensus

p.

facile

p.

obediens fui.

p.

Obsignavi

q.

exardescens

q.

gratiose

q.

providi mandato.

q.

Exposui

r.

pracupiens

r.

attente

r.

servivi

r.

Contribui

s.

attendens

s.

fideliter

s.

inservivi

s.

Elargitus sum

t.

gaudens

t.

excellenter

t.

obsequens fui

t.

Donavi

u.

latus

u.

optime

u.

ossequetissimus fui

u.

Porrexi

x.

cupidus

x.

gaudenter

x.

morem gessi.

x.

Concessi

y.

desiderans

y.

principaliter

y.

parens fui

y.

Misi

z.

latabundus

z.

pracipue

z.

obsequium prastiti

z.

Tribui

 

 

 

 


152

 

 

 

22.

 

23.

 

24.

 

25.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

ea ratione

a.

te jubente

a.

Philippo

a.

fideli

b.

ea causa

b.

tua causa

b.

Vincentio

b.

amico

c.

earn ob rem

c.

tuo nomine

c.

Antonio

c.

sodali

d.

proinde

d.

tua gratia

d.

Johanni

d.

familiari

e.

sic

e.

jusso tuo

e.

Fabio

e.

consorti

f.

quapropter

f.

mandato tuo

f.

Flaminio

f.

collega

g.

ideo

g.

nutu tuo

g.

Petro

g.

focio

h.

itaque

h.

tuo obsequio

h.

Francisco

h.

contubernali

i.

igitur

i.

tuis verbis

i.

Jacobo

i.

amabili

l.

quamobrem

l.

tuo jussu

l.

Marcello

l.

benevolo

m.

eapropter

m.

gratia tua

m.

Mario

m.

protectori

n.

ea de causa

n.

tuo consilio

n.

Octavio

n.

custodi

o.

obeam rem

o.

tuo mandato

o.

Decio

o.

conservatori

p.

iccirco

p.

tua voluntate

p.

Ferdinando

p.

domestico

q.

propterea

q.

tuo libitu

q.

Alphonso

q.

participi

r.

eam ob causam

r.

iemonente

r.

Mutio

r.

commensali

s.

quas ob res

s.

te volente

s.

Simeoni

s.

conjuncto

t.

qua-re

t.

tuo commodo

t.

Lelio

t.

consocio

u.

quocirca

u.

te mandante

u.

Valerio

u.

creditori

x.

ex boc

x.

tuis literis

x.

Aurelio

x.

tutori

y.

banc obrem

y.

tui amore

y.

Metallo

y.

amicissimo

z.

inde

z.

 

z.

Seleuco

z.

intimo

 

 

 

 

 


153

 

 

 

26.

 

27.

 

28.

 

29.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

centum

a.

decem

a.

denariolos

a.

supellectili.

b.

duobus centum

b.

duo de viginti

b.

coronatos

b.

domo.

c.

septies mille

c.

quadraginta

c.

argetoeos denarios

c.

venditione.

d.

quarter centum

d.

quatuor

d.

uncias

d.

familia.

e.

tercentum

e.

quinque

e.

argenteos numos

e.

censu.

f.

bis centum

f.

novem

f.

aureos nummos

f.

patrimonio.

g.

octies mille

g.

septem

g.

obolos

g.

proventu.

h.

bis mille

h.

sex

h.

trientes

h.

reditu.

i.

ter mille

i.

duo

i.

nummos

i.

hereditate

l.

quarter mille

l.

unum

l.

sextercia

l.

pensione

m.

quinquies mille

m.

undecim

m.

talenta

m.

fraternis opib

n.

quinquies centu

n.

duodecim

n.

nummulos

n.

redditibus

o.

duo millia

o.

quatuordecim

o.

asses

o.

re privata

p.

sex millia

p.

quindecim

p.

sextercios

p.

re paterna

q.

septem millia

q.

duo de triginta

q.

denarios

q.

re tua

r.

mille

r.

undeviginit

r.

aureos denarios

r.

publico provetu

s.

novies mille

s.

viginti

s.

aureos

s.

dotali pecunia

t.

novies mille

t.

octo

t.

carolenos

t.

emptione

u.

decies mille

u.

triginta

u.

minas

u.

legata pecunia

x.

undecies mille

x.

quinquaginta

x.

libras

x.

arario

y.

duodecies mille

y.

septuaginta

y.

florenos

y.

bonis tuis

z.

tredecies mille

z.

octuaginta

z.

numos argenteos

z.

trapezita

 

 

 

 


154

 

 

 

30.

 

31.

 

32.

 

33.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

aliud

a.

remanens est

a.

jubeto

a.

obsequar

b.

novum negotiu

b.

remanet

b.

dicito

b.

parebo

c.

quicquam novu

c.

reliquum est

c.

impera

c.

inserviam

d.

aliqua res

d.

relinquitur

d.

pracipito

d.

obtemperabo

e.

aliquid

e.

restat

e.

quarito

e.

morem geram

f.

quapiam

f.

residet

f.

imperato

f.

amicum prastabo

g.

quicquam

g.

residuum est

g.

jube

g.

obsequiu prastabo

h.

aliudnegotium

h.

residens est

h.

dic

h.

rem faciam

i.

aliares

i.

superest

i.

quare

i.

rem exequar

l.

nonnibil

l.

est praterea

l.

pete

l.

perficiam

m.

nova res

m.

vacat

m.

petito

m.

fatisfaciam

n.

que res

n.

est insuper

n.

oftendito

n.

jussum exequar

o.

aliquid novi

o.

adjungitur

o.

flagitato

o.

usui ero

p.

quid

p.

superat

p.

exposce

p.

fatisfacere conabor

q.

quicquid

q.

adbuc extat

q.

exposcito

q.

obedire conabor

r.

aliquidnovum

r.

necessarium est

r.

postulato

r.

inservire conabor

s.

quidpiam novi

s.

desit praterea

s.

certiorem fac

s.

obteperare conabor

t.

agendum aliud

t.

deest etiam

t.

fac ut intelliga

t.

obsequi conabor

u.

quidpiam

u.

super extat

u.

rogato

u.

parere conabor

x.

negotiu aliquod

x.

etiamnu deest

x.

scribe

x.

providebo

y.

aliquod negociu

y.

excedit

y.

roga

y.

amicum geram

z.

aliud officium

z.

superadditur

z.

commonefacito

z.

providere coabor

 

 

 

 


155

 

 

 

34.

 

35.

 

36.

 

37.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

laqueatus

a.

unica

a.

et

a.

oportuna

b.

inductus

b.

singulari

b.

&

b.

amabili

c.

coactus

c.

rara

c.

z

c.

solida

d.

devinctus

d.

insigni

d.

(capital e)

d.

benigna

e.

commotus

e.

magnifica

e.

nec minus

e.

nobili

f.

ductus

f.

prastanti

f.

aque ac

f.

perspicua

g.

adductus

g.

pracellenti

g.

perinde ac

g.

dilucida

h.

constrictus

h.

proba

h.

atque

h.

aqua

i.

permotus

i.

excellenti

i.

atque

i.

recta

l.

illaqueatus

l.

syncera

l.

atq.

l.

dulci

m.

irretitus

m.

recta

m.

nec non

m.

clara

n.

vinctus

n.

integra

n.

eademque

n.

generosa

o.

astrictus

o.

prasigni

o.

perinde atque

o.

insigni

p.

devinctus

p.

mirifica

p.

que

p.

conspicua

q.

constrictus

q.

pura

q.

ac

q.

manifesta

r.

captus

r.

facili

r.

atque

r.

eleganti

s.

motus

s.

pia

s.

veluti

s.

prastanti

t.

commotus

t.

modesta

t.

simul &

t.

indubia

u.

submissus

u.

suavi

u.

simul ac

u.

jucunda

x.

nodatus

x.

dulci

x.

& simul

x.

benevola

y.

destrictus

y.

fida

y.

ac etiam

y.

dulcissima

z.

coarctatus

z.

ornata

z.

sicut

z.

familiari

 

 

 

 


156

 

 

 

38.

 

39.

 

40.

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

humanitate

a.

Tua

a.

jube

b.

probitate

b.

Animitui

b.

facito

c.

bonitate

c.

morum tuorum

c.

jubeto

d.

virtute

d.

majorum tuorum

d.

placeat

e.

sinceritate

e.

parentum tuorum

e.

jubeat

f.

urbanitate

f.

fermanorum tuorum

f.

animo sit

g.

benevolentia

g.

generis tui

g.

voluntas sit

h.

comitate

h.

familia tua

h.

cordi sit

i.

gratia

i.

propinquorum tuorum

i.

commodum sit

l.

caritate

l.

indolis tua

l.

animo sedeat

m.

pietate

m.

patruum tuorum

m.

efficito

n.

integritate

n.

amicorum tuorum

n.

perficito

o.

liberalitate

o.

cognatorum tuorum

o.

patiatut animus

p.

societate

p.

piliorum tuorum

p.

conficito

q.

largitate

q.

fily tui

q.

videatur

r.

magnanimitate

r.

matris tua

r.

fer at animus

s.

aquitate

s.

affinium tuorum

s.

finito

t.

lenitate

t.

patris tui

t.

fac

u.

beneficentia

u.

pronepotum tuorum

u.

ferat mens

x.

aquabilitate

x.

sororis tua

x.

tibi placeat

y.

modestia

y.

natorum tuorum

y.

ferat cor

z.

facilitate

z.

beredum tuorum

z.

ferat desyderium

 

 

 


157

 

 

 

41.

 

42.

 

43.

 

44.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

consscius

a.

pertinentibus

a.

conjunctim

a.

gaudeam

b.

clarior

b.

filys

b.

una

b.

gaudio afficiar

c.

apertior

c.

negocys

c.

tecum

c.

later

d.

dilucidior

d.

consilys

d.

& ipse

d.

exulter

e.

admonitus

e.

arcanis

e.

junctim

e.

congratuler

f.

commonefactus

f.

secretis

f.

amice

f.

jucunder

g.

exploratus

g.

domesticis

g.

nobiscum

g.

leticia afficiar

h.

scientior

h.

necessarys

h.

ego etiam

h.

voluptate fruar

i.

clarus

i.

agnatis

i.

ipse etiam

i.

voluptate afficiar

l.

perspicuus

l.

fratribus

l.

merito

l.

gratuler

m.

praclarus

m.

amicis

m.

simul

m.

voluptate perfruar

n.

non obscurus

n.

familiaribus

n.

familiariter

n.

solatio fruar

o.

tertus

o.

parentibus

o.

optimo jure

o.

solatio perfruar

p.

non novus

p.

genitoribus

p.

jure

p.

letificer

q.

certior factus

q.

natis

q.

invicem

q.

congandeam

r.

edoctus

r.

germanis

r.

simul quoque

r.

solatio afficiar

s.

imbutus

s.

fororibus

s.

simul una

s.

leticia fruar

t.

tertior

t.

proximis

t.

ego quoque

t.

leticia perfruar

u.

scientissimus

u.

rebus

u.

ipse quoque

u.

jubilem

x.

clarissimus

x.

liberis

x.

affatim

x.

gaudio fruar

y.

certissimus

y.

cogitationib

y.

legitime

y.

jucunditate afficiar

z.

notior

z.

consocys

z.

multum

z.

gaudio perfruar

 

 

 

 


158

 

 

 

45.

 

46.

 

47.

 

48.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

doleam.

a.

Vive foelix.

a.

Descrip:

a.

Venetys.

b.

dolore afficiar.

b.

Baleas.

b.

Conscriptu

b.

Catana

c.

moeream.

c.

Bene valeas

c.

Confectum

c.

Fetzelffusy

d.

trifticia afficiar.

d.

Sospes sis

d.

Descriptu

d.

Roma

e.

trifter.

e.

Vale

e.

Conscript:

e.

Corcyra

f.

fim in dolore.

f.

Cura valetudinem

f.

Dat:

f.

Patavy.

g.

sim in tristicia.

g.

Diu vale

g.

Perscriptu

g.

Messana

h.

contrister.

h.

Valetudinem cura

h.

Obsignatu

h.

Panbormi.

i.

sim in moerore

i.

Foelix vive

i.

Perscripta

i.

Mediolani.

l.

moerorem sentiam.

l.

Valetudini consule

l.

Script:

l.

Placentia

m.

maerorem patiar.

m.

Dy te sospitent.

m.

Exaratum

m.

Papia.

n.

tristitiam sentiam

n.

Inservi valetudini

n.

Exar:

n.

vercellis

o.

affigar

o.

Valetudini inservi.

o.

Perscrip:

o.

Alexandria

p.

conturber.

p.

Valeto

p.

Data

p.

Syracusis.

q.

afflictier.

q.

Indulge valetudini.

q.

Obsignate

q.

Leonty.

r.

condoleam.

r.

Diu valeas.

r.

Scripte

r.

Cajeta.

s.

dolorem sentiam.

s.

Incolumis sis.

s.

Exarata

s.

Senis.

t.

perturber.

t.

Bene vale.

t.

datum

t.

Neapoli.

u.

angar.

u.

Diu valeto.

u.

Descripta

u.

Salerni

x.

doloribus afficiar.

x.

Bene valeto.

x.

Obsign.

x.

Mantua

y.

moerore afficiar.

y.

Incolumis vive.

y.

Confecta

y.

Capua

z.

fleam.

z.

Multum valeas.

z.

inscripta

z.

Aaquileia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


159

 

 

 

49.

 

50.

 

51.

 

52.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

1.

a.

January

a.

1559.

a.

Tuus

b.

2.

b.

February

b.

1540.

b.

T.

c.

3.

c.

Marty

c.

1541.

c.

Tuus fidelis

d.

4.

d.

Aprilis

d.

1622.

d.

Semper

e.

5.

e.

Jun:

e.

1543.

e.

Dum vixero

f.

6.

f.

May.

f.

1544.

f.

Tuus quem nosti

g.

7.

g.

July

g.

1560.

g.

Tuus ad mortem

h.

8.

h.

Augusti

h.

1546.

h.

Fidelis

i.

9.

i.

Septembris

i.

1547.

i.

Ofticiosus

l.

10.

l.

Octobris

l.

1568.

l.

Tuus adextremum balitum

m.

11.

m.

Novembris

m.

1549.

m.

Tuus dum vixero

n.

12.

n.

Decembris

n.

1550.

n.

Vester

o.

13.

o.

Sextilis

o.

1551.

o.

Tuus officiosus

p.

14.

p.

Quintilis

p.

1552.

p.

Tuus ad quavis officia paratus

q.

15.

q.

Januar:

q.

1553.

q.

paratissimus

r.

16.

r.

Februar:

r.

1554.

r.

Vester dum vixero

s.

17.

s.

Mart:

s.

1555.

s.

Vester fidelis

t.

18.

t.

April:

t.

1556.

t.

Vester semper

u.

19.

u.

May.

u.

1557.

u.

Tuus senaper

x.

20.

x.

Juny.

x.

1558.

x.

Vester officiosus

y.

21.

y.

Jul:

y.

1539.

y.

Vester ad mortem

z.

22.

z.

Aug.

z.

1545.

z.

Tuus qui semper

 

 

 

 


160

 

 

 

53.

 

54.

 

55.

 

56.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

socius

a.

Fabricius

a.

Carafa

a.

Panbormitanus

b.

assecla

b.

Pantbeus

b.

Severinus

b.

Venetus

c.

amicus

c.

Joachimus

c.

Galeotus

c.

neapolitanus

d.

fidelis

d.

Paulus

d.

Porta

d.

Romanus

e.

conscius

e.

Baptista

e.

Hercules

e.

Patavinus

f.

dilectus

f.

scipio

f.

daniel

f.

veronensis

g.

familiaris

g.

Bernbardus

g.

Sforza

g.

Cremonensis

h.

famulus

h.

Casar

h.

Fracastorius

h.

Mantuanus

i.

verna

i.

Philippus

i.

Selenus

i.

Germanus

l.

amatus

l.

Ambrosius

l.

Balena

l.

Genuensis

m.

adamatus

m.

Nicolaus

m.

Anisus

m.

Suessanus

n.

comes

n.

Pompejus

n.

Trivignus

n.

surrentinus

o.

intimus

o.

Albertus

o.

Galeopsis

o.

Perusinus

p.

minister

p.

Petrus

p.

Delpbinus

p.

Senensis

q.

consors

q.

Hieronymus

q.

Sinesius

q.

Bergoma

r.

collega

r.

Dominicus

r.

Valla

r.

Mediolanensis

s.

contubernalis

s.

Andreas

s.

Berosius

s.

Vicentinus

t.

consanguineus

t.

antonius

t.

perusius

t.

Placentinus

u.

servus

u.

Claudius

u.

Dilectus

u.

Cordubensis

x.

frater

x.

Augustus

x.

Pyronta

x.

Hispanus

y.

nepos

y.

Dionysius

y.

Valerius

y.

Calaber

z.