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Bacon

SONNET NO. 112

 

      Your love and pity doth the impression fill
      Which vulgar scandal stamp'd upon my brow
      For what care I who calls me well or ill,
      So you o'er green my bad, my good allow?
      You are my all the world and I must strive
      To know my shames and praises from your tongue
      None else to me, nor I to none alive,
      That my steel'd sense or changes right or wrong
      In so profound abysm, I through all care
      Of others' voices, that my adders sense
      To critic and to flatter stopped are:
      Mark how with my neglect I do dispense,
      You are so strongly in my purpose bred
      That all the world beside me thinks you are dead.
 

 


  Note the repetition of the following, we find-my brow, my

bad, my good, my all, my shames, my stelled sense, my adders
sense, my neglect, my purpose.

1st Line.  The impression fill = effaces the scar.
2nd Line.  Vulgar = common or public.
4th Line.  Allow = approve.
11th Line.  Critic = censure.
12th Line.  Dispense=excuse.

  This sonnet continues the thoughts which we find in the last
Sonnet No.111 and once more disposes of any claims that Will
Shakspere wrote this sonnet.  The poet says that your love
and pity fill up the impression that vulgar scandal had stamped
on his brow.  Will Shakspere never in his life suffered from
any vulgar scandal but Bacon did when he was impeached.
  Bacon writes that he little cares who calls him well (praises)
or calls him ill (blames him) so long as " your love and pity
will o'er green (conceal) his bad points and allow his good points.
He writes that she is his all the world and that he must strive to
know from her both blame and praise and that right or wrong
he cares nothing for the opinion of anyone else or if they criticise or flatter, because his muse is so strongly bred in his purpose, which was to benefit mankind. Here again, he once more asks for love and pity (as he does in Sonnet No.111) from some dear friend, his angel guide in another world.

 

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