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King James

SONNET NO. 88

 


     When thou shalt be disposed to set me light
     And place my merit in the eye of scorn
     Upon thy side against myself I'll fight
     And prove thee virtuous though thou art forsworn
     With mine own weakness  being best acquainted
     Upon thy part I can set down a story
     Of faults concealed wherein I am attainted
     That thou in losing me shall win much glory,
     And I by this will be a gainer too:
     For bending all my loving thoughts on thee
     The injuries  that to myself I do
     Doing thee vantage double vantage  me
     Such is my love, to thee I do belong
     That for thy right  myself will bear all wrong.

 


  This sonnet is also addressed by Bacon to King James where
he tells the King that although the King is disposed to consider
him worthless (set him light) and to scorn his merit, he will
fight on the side of the King against himself and try and prove
the King virtuous, although the King is foresworn (perjured),
as he knows his own weakness in believing that his King can do
no wrong.  (Bacon in his own writings tells us that he believes
in the divine right of Kings.)  Bacon then tells the King that he
could set down a story of faults  concealed wherin he is attainted. Bacon informs us that he was attainted, which was true of Bacon
but not of Shakspere who was never attainted and could not ever
have been.  So it follows that this sonnet was not written by
Shakspere.  Bacon writes that by losing him the King shall
win much glory but Bacon's gain is his loving thoughts for his
King although he has been so badly treated and that the injury
he had done to himself by pleading guilty had been of assistance
to his King-such was his love for his King that as a servant
he belonged to his King and that he bears his injuries  to support the right of his King to do anything he wishes to do.    

After his fall Bacon wrote a letter to Buckingham in which he says: I hope His Majesty will reap honour out of my adversity.  His Majesty knows best his own ways.

 

 

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