A. Phoenix

A Collection of Works by A. Phoenix on SirBacon.org

A Collection of Works by A. Phoenix on SirBacon.org

October 11, 2021

Perhaps the most significant and consequential letter ever written to Sir Francis Bacon was written on Oct 11th. by his private secretary and confidant, Thomas Meautys (TM)

Thanks to the A.Phoenix team and the Lambeth Palace Library for providing the original letter.
To find out more about this letter (Pages 41-) and the historical circumstances that it references see :

http://www.sirbacon.org/FRANCIS BACONS DEATH.pdf


Click image for full-sized


Click image for full-sized

Sirbacon.org wishes to thank the A. Phoenix team for permission to share these slides from their Video Slideshow :

Did Francis Bacon die in 1626 or Feign his Death with the help of his Rosicrucian Brotherhood?


Click image for full-sized


Click image for full-sized


September 5, 2021

"Did Francis Bacon die in 1626? Or did he feign his death with the help of his Rosicrucian-Freemason Brotherhood?" by A. Phoenix.

Francis Bacon's Death.pdf

SYNOPSIS

DID FRANCIS BACON DIE IN 1626? OR DID HE FEIGN HIS DEATH WITH THE HELP OF HIS ROSICRUCIAN-FREEMASONRY BROTHERHOOD?

Following his fall from grace which was one of the greatest political betrayals in English history, in order that King James could save the favourite George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, and so that he could save himself, Francis Bacon spent the last five years of his recorded life writing, revising and translating his works for publication with the help of his good pens among them Ben Jonson and George Hebert. During the last year of his life the health of James I was steadily deteriorating and he was rarely able to visit London, while the favourite Buckingham who had sacrificed Bacon and in his distress extorted York House from him, took the opportunity to extend his influence over the heir to the throne, Prince Charles. On 27 March 1625 King James died at Theobalds with Buckingham at his bedside. These are the simple facts known to general history. Following the succession there was no return to favour for Bacon or any offer of a position in the new regime or government and the two of them Charles I and Buckingham believed they could jointly rule without the need or advice of the kingdom's greatest and wisest statesman. He knew better than anyone and had first-hand experience of the behaviour of monarchs towards those they perceived as a threat or had fallen out of favour.

In the weeks and months leading up to Bacon's supposed death a certain George Eglisham's, one of King James's physicians, was busy writing an explosive pamphlet entitled The Forerunner of Revenge which when published caused a sensation and had very far reaching consequences for Charles I and the favourite Buckingham. In the pamphlet Eglisham directly accused Buckingham of poisoning and murdering his lover and royal master James I as well as other members of the nobility including the Earl of Southampton to whom Bacon had dedicated his Shakespeare poems Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece. There were also many who believed that King Charles had been complicit in the murder of his father King James and Bacon too feared King Charles would try to kill him. The great philosopher died to the profane world on Easter Sunday 9 April 1626 and on 8 May the most reviled and hated man in the kingdom Buckingham was impeached by the House of Lords on charges relating to causing evils affecting the state, bribery and corruption on a colossal scale, and the murder of King James. The decision by King Charles not to allow Buckingham’s impeachment to proceed to trial by dissolving parliament at the cost of a much needed subsidy bill led more to believe or strongly suspect he was complicit with Buckingham in the foul act of killing a king, the very progenitor of his own royal blood. These events eventually led to the assassination of Buckingham in 1628 and helped set in train the state execution of Charles I and the English Civil War.

In the meantime hidden to mainstream history for four hundred years Bacon having feigned his own death with the help of his Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood apparently quietly slipped off to the continent, perhaps travelling first to France and moving on to The Hague in the Netherlands, before eventually spending many years in Germany with Johann Valentin Andreae living to a very old age.

Evidence for his second life includes textual evidence involving indications he did not die in 1626 ('He is gone, he is gone: it suffices for my woe to have uttered this: I have not said he is dead'), etc. Letters, one written in his prose including the phrase 'when I was alive', another letter written by Sir Thomas Meautys to Bacon dating from 11 October 1631, proving he was still very much alive five years after his supposed death in 1626, as stated in every single orthodox biography to the present day. There is also a good deal of evidence supporting that Bacon was responsible for producing, revising and enlarging his own works, and for his direct involvement in writings published in the name of others, post 1626. He also wrote the little known poem 'On Worthy Master William Shakespeare' prefixed to the 1632 Second Shakespeare Folio and was responsible for 1,679 changes in what was an attempt to clarify and correct the text including hundreds of alterations in grammar, changes pertaining to the action, and amendments and revisions, affecting metre and style. There is also evidence for his involvement in the publication of the first English translation of the Rosicrucian manifestos the Fama and Confessio (1652) and the publication of the unique version of his New Atlantis known as The Land of the Rosicrucians (1662). This is all supported by extensive cryptographic evidence, Rosicrucian-Freemasonic frontispieces, portraits and engravings, including a portrait with the initials 'F. B.' prominently displayed in it depicting Francis Bacon as a very old man. He was born in secrecy and died in secrecy all of which is known to the select elite of his present day Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood who will eventually disclose to the world where Bacon truly died and where he is actually buried, that he is the true author of the Shakespeare works, as well as other secrets about his life and writings. The full truth will truly stagger humankind.


August 12, 2021

'Rare Images of Francis Bacon-Shakespeare the Supreme Head of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood' Video by A. Phoenix

'Rare images' takes a brief pictorial look at some of the powerful evidence revealing Francis Bacon as Shakespeare & the Supreme Head of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood.

Rare Images of Francis Bacon-Shakespeare the Supreme Head of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood


June 30, 2021

"The Secret, Hidden, and Obscured, Relationship Between FB and the Jaggards, Printers and Publisher of his Essays and the Shakespeare First Folio. " by A. Phoenix.

For the last four centuries the authoritative Bacon and Shakespeare editors and biographers have systematically suppressed the truth about the relationship between Francis Bacon and the Jaggards, printers and publishers of his Essays and the First Folio of the Shakespeare works. It surely does not need to be said that if somebody is suppressing the full facts and truth from us, and in this instance the rest of the world also, that they are concealing and hiding something. And if we just consider for a single moment the all-encompassing lengths required for this kind of concealment one which has been very carefully maintained over a period of four hundred years, it follows that the commensurate enormity and implications of the secret must be of monumental proportions. A secret is always bound up in its concealment. Thus if what is being withheld from us is the secret relationship between Francis Bacon and the Jaggards the printers and publishers of the Shakespeare First Folio, it is likely to be (and in this case is) that the Folio was printed and published for Francis Bacon by the Jaggards, with whom, which is here revealed for the first time, he had a hidden and obscured relationship over a period of some four decades.

In the second half of the twentieth century the American scholar Charlton Hinman subjected the printing of the First Folio to a forensic technical study in The Printing and Proof-Reading of the First Folio of Shakespeare (Oxford Clarendon Press) based on an investigation of some eighty copies in the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington. Like most large standard works it remains largely unread from cover to cover and some of its contents remain effectively hidden and unknown to the world. In this work he draws attention to a unique copy of the Shakespeare First Folio with a unique upside down 'B' on the first page of the first play The Tempest as well as a defective 'S' of 'Actus primus, Scena prima' and the mis-signed signature 'B' at the bottom of the page: about which he says Baconians will perhaps find meanings in the broken 'S' and in the two 'B's 'that invite such particular attention in the earliest state of page A1.)'. Yet remarkably Professor Hinman does not directly say or explain what meaning Baconians might find in these peculiarities, which is also revealed here for the first time.

The upside down positioning of the ornamental letter 'B' is unique to one copy of the Folio, however the same ornamental 'B' appears in all other copies but the correct way round. If the large ornamental B is magnified it reveals the name Francis Bacon hidden in the decorative scroll with the name Francis across the top and at the bottom and the name Bacon down the right side. This explosive and decisive evidence completely demolishes the illusion William Shakspere was responsible for the Shakespeare works, a fiction first presented to the world nearly four hundred years ago with the publication of the First Folio, printed in the Jaggard printing shop by William and Isaac Jaggard in 1623.

FB AND THE JAGGARDS.pdf

Bacon is Shakespeare: The Jaggard Connection Video by A. Phoenix:


June 26, 2021

Francis Bacon's Poem "The Life of Man"


June 12, 2021

"Francis Bacon, the God-Like Rosicrucian figure of Duke Vincentio, and the Unpublished Speeches of Lord Keeper Sir Nicholas Bacon in Measure for Measure." by A. Phoenix.

One of the less familiar dramas in the Shakespeare canon Measure for Measure has at its heart the God-like Rosicrucian figure of Duke Vincentio one akin to Prospero in The Tempest described by Dr Yates as a Rosicrucian manifesto. The role of the Duke is one of the longest roles in the Shakespeare canon. He is seen by many Shakespeare scholars as a surrogate of the dramatist himself with the joint Arden editors of Measure for Measure correctly maintaining that its author ‘sets up the correspondences between himself and the duke…extensively’, and that, Measure for Measure ‘persistently hints that the Duke is a playwright made in Shakespeare’s image’. Or put another way the secretive, complex and enigmatic character of Duke Vincentio, who adopts multiple masks, disguises and identities in Measure for Measure represents Shakespeare, that is to say, the true author of the play, who himself outside of the play itself, also adopts multiple identities and disguises behind his various literary living masks including the pseudonym of Shakespeare. The Duke is a complex dramatic portrait of his creator Francis Bacon, the supreme head of the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood, with the Duke in the play watching over Vienna just like Bacon, reflected in his Rosicrucian utopia New Atlantis, watches over the world and the future of mankind. In the play the Duke seeks to build a new, fair, and just society one based upon love just as Bacon with his Rosicrucian Brotherhood set in motion a plan for A Universal Reformation of the Whole World.

The intertwined themes of law and justice, sex and death, and the Rosicrucian-Freemasonry Brotherhood that are threaded all the way through Measure for Measure are mirrored and reflected in more than twenty of Bacon’s acknowledged writings and works, among them: unpublished manuscripts, private letters and speeches; his Meditationes Sacrae , Of Colours of Good and Evil, various essays including Of Judicature, Of Seditions and Troubles, and Of Death, one of the central themes of the play; as well as An Inquiry Concerning the Ways of Death and The History of Life and Death; the Gesta Grayorum and other dramatic devices; religious and political tracts including  A Confession of Faith and A Brief Discourse Touching the Happy Union of the Kingdom of England and Scotland; his major philosophical and scientific treatises The Advancement of Learning, Novum Organum and De Augmentis Scientiarum ; and several of his obscure or relatively unknown and unread legal treatises A Proclamation Touching the Marches, The Charge of Owen Indicted for High Treason, A Proposition Touching the Compiling and Amendments of Law, and Touching the Office of Constable; as well as his Rosicrucian utopia New Atlantis (or, The Land of the Rosicrucians) and the first Rosicrucian manifesto the Fama Fraternitatis.

MEASURE FOR MEASURE.pdf

Francis Bacon, the God-like Rosicrucian Figure of Duke Vincentio in Measure for Measure Video by A. Phoenix:


May 13, 2021

"FRANCIS BACON AND HIS EARLIEST SHAKESPEARE PLAY HAMLET A TUDOR FAMILY TRAGEDY" by A. Phoenix.

The Tragedy of Hamlet shadows the most explosive and sensational secrets of the Elizabethan reign in which the not so Virgin Queen Elizabeth was secretly married to Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester with whom she had two concealed royal princes Francis Tudor Bacon and Robert Tudor Devereux. It tells the tale of its author a disinherited royal prince Francis Tudor Bacon in the shape of Hamlet who is denied his rightful kingship by his mother Queen Elizabeth and  the exhaustion and death of the royal Tudor dynasty.

Behind its dramatis personae lies the leading figures of the Elizabethan period: Francis Bacon Tudor concealed Prince of Wales (Prince Hamlet), Queen Elizabeth Tudor (Queen Gertrude) and her secret husband Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester (King Claudius), Robert Tudor Devereux, the second Earl of Essex (Laertes), Sir Nicholas Bacon (the Ghost of Old Hamlet) and Sir William Cecil (Polonius).

It is a story of a lustful Queen Elizabeth and the notorious poisoner and murderer Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and the strange death possibly through poisoning by Leicester of Sir Nicholas Bacon.  It is a play that is all about revenge, murder and death, with poisonings of Old Hamlet, King Claudius, Queen Gertrude, Laertes and Hamlet himself, and by other means, the deaths of Polonius, Ophelia, and the two state spies, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern.

Interspersed throughout the whole of the dissertation of the telling of this royal Tudor tragedy are lines, sentences and passages identical in thought and similar in expression, providing resemblances, correspondences and parallels from more than thirty of Bacon’s writings and works, among them: unpublished manuscripts, private letters and speeches; various essays including Of Revenge and Of Death, the two central themes of the play; as well as An Inquiry Concerning the Ways of Death and The History of Life and Death; short occasional pieces Physiological Remains and Short Notes for Civil Conversation; political works A Brief Discourse Touching the Happy Union of the Kingdom of England and Scotland and The Case of the Post-Nati of Scotland as well as the state sanctioned A Declaration of the Practices and Treasons of the Earl of Essex; his major philosophical and scientific treatises The Advancement of Learning, The Wisdom of the Ancients, Novum Organum, De Augmentis Scientiarum and Sylva Sylvarum; and several of his obscure or relatively unknown and unread legal treatises A Discourse upon the Commission of Bridewell, The Argument in Lowes Case of Tenures, The Charge of Owen Indicted for High Treason, The Reading Upon the Statues of Uses, The Maxims of the Common Law and The Ordinances made by Lord Chancellor Bacon in Chancery.

This and other evidence emphatically demonstrates beyond any reasonable doubt Francis Bacon’s authorship of the earliest and greatest Shakespeare Tudor Tragedy in the history of world literature.

FRANCIS BACON AND HIS EARLIEST SHAKESPEARE PLAY HAMLET A TUDOR FAMILY TRAGEDY.pdf

Francis Bacon's Hamlet A Tudor Family Tragedy Video by A. Phoenix:


March 22, 2021

"Francis Bacon's Unrecognised Cambridge Manuscript and The Taming of The Shrew" by A. Phoenix.

This academic research paper reveals for the first time an unrecognised Francis Bacon philosophical-scientific manuscript entitled Giardino Cosmografico Cultivato (Cultivated Cosmographical Garden) prefaced by Greek and Latin poems from Lady Anne Cooke Bacon and her three sisters Lady Mildred Cooke Cecil, Lady Elizabeth Cooke Hoby and Lady Katherine Cooke Killigrew. The unique manuscript (Cambridge University MS Li.537) presented as being the work of one Dr Bartholo Sylva (who is not known to have written any other work during his lifetime) is copied out in the fine Italic hand of the Bacon family calligraphist and illuminator Petruccio Ubaldini. This little known figure who spent much time with the Bacon family at Gorhambury and York House and had a long hitherto hidden and obscured relationship with Francis Bacon for more than thirty years is here established for the first time as the model for Petruccio in The Taming of the Shrew. In the play Petruccio pursues Katherine who shares the same Christian name of Bacon's aunt Katherine Cooke Killigrew, younger sister of Lady Anne Cooke Bacon. In The Taming of the Shrew Katherine has a sister named Bianca from which can be derived the anagrammatic contraction AN BAC that clearly suggests the name Anne Bacon. In the play while able to choose from a countless number of names our supreme poet and dramatist gives Petrucci's father the name Antonio, the Italian form of the Christian name of Anthony Bacon. He also furnishes Petruccio with several servants who are met with after his marriage to Katherine at his country house two of whom are named Nicholas and Nathaniel the same Christian names of his two elder half-brothers (from Lord Keeper Nicholas Bacon's first marriage) Sir Nicholas and Sir Nathaniel Bacon. Thus hidden in plain sight the controversial comedy The Taming of the Shrew seen for what it is, was a Bacon family affair, a humorous send-up written by the supreme family poet, Francis Bacon.

CAMBRIDGE MANUSCRIPT.pdf

Francis Bacon's Unrecognised Cambridge Manuscript and The Taming of The Shrew Video by A. Phoenix:


March 10, 2021

A. Phoenix has produced a video that goes with the recent Essay, "The Misfortunes of Arthur."

Francis Bacon's Unacknowledged Play The Misfortunes of Arthur and its Links to his Shakespeare Plays


February 17, 2021

Francis Bacon's authorship of the play Like Will to Like written when he was only seven years old

A. Phoenix reveals here for the first time in this academic research paper and accompanying video that Francis Bacon wrote the play Like Will to Like when he was seven years old. This morality play is about good and evil and its central character is Newfangle the Vice. The dichotomy of good and evil or the colours of good and evil was later written large across the much more expansive canvass of his Shakespeare poems and plays and as pointed out by orthodox editors and scholars the figure of the Vice is refracted through various Shakespeare villains and characters i.e. Lucrece, Aaron the Moor in Titus Andronicus, Richard III, Don John in Much Ado About Nothing, Iago in Othello, etc, etc. And remarkably In the closing song of Twelfth Night or What You Will Bacon obliquely reveals that when he was a young boy he wrote the morality play Like Will to Like (see pp. 104-7)

View the video of Francis Bacon's authorship of the play "Like Will to Like" written when he was only seven years old:

Check out the Francis Bacon's authorship of the play Like Will to Like written when he was only seven years old page and download the PDF.


January 22, 2021

Happy Birthday Lord Bacon - 'Francis Bacon Cryptically reveals himself as the Author of Hamlet in the first Fourteen lines of his Immortal Play'

Many Thanks to A. Phoenix who has graciously allowed sirbacon.org permission to present on Francis Bacon's Birthday a short 7 page article with images entitled 'Happy Birthday Lord Bacon - Francis Bacon Cryptically reveals himself as the Author of Hamlet in the first Fourteen lines of his Immortal Play'

Happy Birthday Lord Bacon

And a short accompanying video with additional material entitled 'Happy Birthday Lord Bacon Secret Author of the Shakespeare Works - Known to Francis Bacon's Rosicrucian - Freemasonry Brotherhood'.


January 1, 2021

FRANCIS BACON AND HIS FIRST UNACKNOWLEDGED SHAKESPEARE PLAY "THE MISFORTUNES OF ARTHUR"
AND ITS EXTENSIVE LINKS TO A WHOLE RANGE OF HIS OTHER SHAKESPEARE PLAYS By A. Phoenix

THE MISFORTUNES OF ARTHUR


November 24, 2020

Part 2 The Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I

Part 2 of the Video by A. Phoenix 'Part 2 The Pregnancy Portrait of Elizabeth I & Secret Birth of Francis Bacon Author of Shakespeare'


November 11, 2020

The Pregnancy Portrait of Queen Elizabeth

A.Phoenix has created Part I video on "The Pregnancy Portrait of Queen of Elizabeth".


SirBacon.org

2021