The Shakespeare Symphony

 

An Introduction To The Ethics Of The Elizabethan Drama

By

Harold Bayley

 

London
CHAPMAN AND HALL LTD.

1906

"The men of one generation can never look at Truth with the same eyes as their fathers. The world changes; the field of knowledge and of action widens; and we, if we be true to our trust, must enlarge our outlook in response. In one age the change will be more rapid, in another less. But quick or slow it is always going forward. Progress is inevitable and it is for our health. Were it to cease, all that is worth to be called life would cease with it; we should sicken into a muddy pool of conformity and traditon."--E. Vaughan

 

Table Of Contents

Chapter

Page

I. London's Parnassus

1

II. The Sweetness And Gravity Of The Dramatic Mind

15

III. The State Of Learning

32

IV. Ecclesiasticism

52

V. Religion

66

VI. Educational Purpose

102

VII. Medicine And Physiology

127

VIII. Elizabethan Audiences

154

IX. Classicisms

165

X. The World-Makers

202

XI. The Problematic Manuscripts

230

XII. The Miscellaneous Similitudes

249

XIII. Error, Wit, And Metaphor

278

XIV. Traits And Idiosyncracies

303

XV. Conclusion

331

Appendix

It is an impossibility nowadays for any student of Elizabethan literature to ignore the so called Shakespeare-Bacon theory. I am uncertain what effect this book may have upon it. While on the one hand it tends to support the claims made on behalf of Bacon and much to enlarge them, on the other--especially as regards the arguments derivable from internal evidence--it reduces the subject, apparently ad absurdum. In any case, however, the additonal light thrown upon it must be an advantage. As a modern scientist has said, Delusion and Error do not perish by controversial warfare. They perish under the slow and silent operations of changes to which they are unable to adapt themselves.--Harold Bayley, 1906

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