Numerical Signatures in the First Folio

 

In the play "The First Part of Henry IV" in the First Folio, 1st column of the page numbered 56, we find the abbreviation "Fran" thirteen times and the word "Francis"twenty times--total thirty-three. Is it a coincidence that "Fran" and "Francis" are found thirty-three times in this column, having regard to the fact that thirty-three is the simple seal or count of the name of Bacon?

Thus : B=2 A=1 C=3 O =14 N=13 = 33

In Elizabethan times the alphabet consisted of twenty-four letters only, I and J and U and V being the same letter.

On the last page of The Comedy of Errors(First Folio page 100), the Abbess says, "Thirty-Three years have I but gone in travail,"etc. The correct period according to certain events recorded in this play cannot be more than twenty-five years. Is this a coincidence, having regard to the fact that thirty-three is the simple seal or count of the word BACON, and that these words "thirty-three"appear in the first column 100 in the First Folio the number 100 being the simple seal or count of the words "Francis Bacon?" Thus

F=6 R= 17 A= 1 N= 13 C= 3 I=9= S = 18 =67

B=2 A=1 C=3 O =14 N=13 = 33

Total = 100

It is considered that "Shakespeare's" play "Julius Caesar" is derived from "Plutarch's Life." In Sir Thomas North's translation of "Plutarch" it is stated that Caesar had three and twenty wounds upon his body. In the play this passage is changed to read three and thirty instead of three and twenty.

Is it a coincidence that in the play Cesar is stated to have had thirty-three wounds, having regard to the fact that thirty-three is the simple seal or count of the word Bacon?
In the first column of page 53 in the Histories (Henry IV, Part I, end of Act 1, and beginning of Act 2) we find the word Bacon spelt with a capital B on the 48th line. If we count all the spoken words from the top until we come to this word Bacon we find that BACON is the 371st spoken word. In this column are seven italic words, and fifty-three (the page number) multiplied by seven is also 371. It will be found that on the 25th line are two words, "Heigh ho," but there is a hyphen between them to make them count as one word, and that on the 44th line are two words "Chamber lye," but there is a hyphen between them to make count as one word. If there had been no hyphen between Heigh and ho and between Chamber and lye, the word Bacon would not have been the 371st word and it would not have borne the same number as the page number multiplied by the italic words in the column.

It would be quite easy for Francis Bacon to arrange that word Bacon should bear the same number as the page number multiplied by the number of italic words in the column containing this word Bacon. There would be no necessity for him to alter the position of the word Bacon in text; all that he had to do was to count down the column to ascertain the postion of the word Bacon and then to make the number of words counting to Bacon agree with number obtained by multiplying the page number by the number of words which he places in italics. It will be found that counting every spoken word in th first column of this page down to and including the word BACON gives us 373. The page number fifty-three multiplied by the seven italic words is 371. To make the word Bacon the 371st word counting down the column he has to get rid of two words, and he does so by placing hyphens between the words Heigh and Ho and between Chamber and Lye.

Here are 373 words, but by inserting these hyphens he reduces them to 371 words, which is what he requires to make the word BACON the 371st word counting down the column to agree with the number 371 the multiple of the page number by the italic words.

This shows a deliberate design, which is confirmed by the following example.

In this same play (Act 4, Scene 2) in the first column of page 67 in the Histories we find the word S. Albones(Saint Albans) on the 45th line. If, as before, we count all the spoken words from the top of the column until we come to S. Albones, we find that S. Albones is the 402nd word. In this column are six italic words, and sixty-seven the page number multiplied by six is 402, which cannot also be a coincidence, having regard to the last example.

Here again, words which are hyphenated are counted as one word. The first hyphenated words are Sutton-cop-hill in the third line. It might be in order to put a hyphen Sutton and cop, but why put a hyphen between cop and hill? unless for some good reason--that reason clearly being to make three words count as one word only. The total number of spoken words down to S. Albones is 415, but by inserting hyphens between certain words Bacon reduces them to 402, the number he requires to make the position of S. Albones (namely the 402nd word) agree with the multiple of the page number by the italic words, which is also 402.

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