THE COLUMBUS OF LITERATURE
or
BACON'S NEW WORLD OF SCIENCES,

 

BY

W. F. C. WIGSTON,

AUTHOR OF

A New Study of Shakespeare," "Bacon, Shakespeare and the Rosicrucians"
"Hermes Stella," "Francis Bacon, Poet, Prophet and Philosopher."

copyright 1892

 

"And now we have with a small bark, such as we were able to set out, sailed about the universal circumference, as well of the old as the new, World of Sciences, with how prosperous winds and course, we leave to posterity to judge." (Book ix P.467 Advancement, I640.)

CHICAGO:
F. J. SCHULTE & CO., PUBLISHERS.
298 DEARBORN STREET.

 

"My belief is that Bacon was profoundly imbued with... knowledge and sought to embalm it in art, for delivery to after ages by what he terms 'the handing on of the Lamp for posterity'; that is, the transmission of certain secret doctrines, which have been preserved in the works of such great poets as Dante, Virgil and even Homer....
The great poets in all times and ages, have been the guardians and transmitters of these mysteries, and the wanderings of Ulysses by Homer, belongs to the same category, being a history of the soul, combined with a history of the race, that is to say, in the adventures of Ulysses we have presented to us parables and allegories of every description, some relating to the temptations of the flesh and the transformations or disguises of the spirit, as in the incidents of Calypso and Circe, others again being historical and dim echoes of the explorations of mankind in a vast prehistoric past.."

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

9

I. THE TEMPEST

33

II. BACON'S ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING, 1640

49

III. FATHER PAUL AND FATHER FULGENTIO, FRANCISCAN FRIARS OF VENICE

71

IV. PAN, DIONYSUS OR BACCHUS, AND PERSEUS (BACON'S THREE FABLES ILLUSTRATING PARABOLICAL POESY AND STAGE PLAYS IN THE "DE AUGMENTIS")

82

V.-THE COMEDY O ERRORS

108

VI.-MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM AND BACON'S THIRTEENTH DEFICIENT OF A NEW WORLD OF SCIENCES, OR MAGIA NATURALIS

129

VII-BACON'S NEW WORLD OF SCIENCES

140

VIII TITLE PAGE ENGRAVING OF ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING

155

IX.-BEN JONSON'S DISCOVERIES OR EXPLORATA

161

X.-CIPHER - CONTINUED

169

XI.-MEASURE FOR MEASURE

184

XII.-THE ROSICRUCIANS

192

XIII GORHAMBURY AND VERULAM

212

 

Why Bacon Used Pseudonyms For His Play writing

pp. 216-7

The modern critic quite forgets, the art of playwright was considered a despised weed, in Bacon's age, as is testified by abundance of evidence.......Seldon declared " It would be impossible for a lord to write verses," and for a man in Bacon's position, whose legal career depended upon solid character and rational learning, to have figured as a play writer, would have exposed him to the mercy of his enemies and ruined him in Elizabeth's eyes, to say nothing that the writing of such treasonable plays as Henry IV would have taken him to the Tower, as it did, indeed, Hayward for the same thing. Everlastingly critics cry out " Why did not Bacon acknowledge his writings?" If he had it is certain he would never have died Viscount St. Albans, or been Lord Keeper! The critic thinks of the modern standing of the actor, he sees the stage ennobled to an art, the theatre a splendid structure of imagination, the drama of now on a level with all that is best in literature and acknowledged (as a profession) in society--but he does not see the Globe, or the Fortune, the Rose, or the Curtain, as they once stood, mere cockpits full of gods and apple-gnawing rabble, seated on rude benches, and the structures themselves (like the Globe) mere mountebank edifices as they are represented in engravings and woodcuts handed down to us! Poetry and play writing in the service of the court, as the composition of masques and barriers, might raise a man like Ben Jonson, who had been a bricklayer, or even a reputed Shakespeare, but it would degrade a nephew of Lord Burleigh, a son of Queen Elizabeth's Lord Keeper, an aspirant at court and on the bench,-- a man whose mother, Lady Anne Bacon, held every eccentricity in abhorrence, with the severity of a straight-laced rigid Puritan. Even Bacon's splendid talents and prose writings raised the voices of his enemies against him. Coke, his great rival and life long foe, declared the Advancement of Learning a work none but a fool would have written, and said Bacon's ship device deserved to be freighted with fools......








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