ADVERSITYPROSPERITY

 

"Prosperity is the blessing of the Old Testament, adversity is the blessing of the New, which carrieth the greater benediction, and the clearer revelation of God's favour.....Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes, and adversity is not without comforts and hopes."—Essay of Adversity.

"Let me embrace thee, sour adversity,
For wise men say it is the wisest course."3 Henry VI. ii. 1

"There is some good in things evil;
Would men observingly distil it out."Henry V. iv. 1

"Adversitys! sweet milk, philosophy." Julius Caesar iii 1

"Sweet are the uses of adversity,
Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous,
Wears yet a precious jewel in its head."As You Like It iii.1

(Comp. : "There is a stone... which, worn, is thought to be good for them that bleed at the nose,....quoere if the stone taken out of the toad's head be not of the like virtue."Natural History Centuries x 967.)

"Virtue is like precious odours, most fragrant when they are incensed or crushed; for prosperity doth best discover vice; but adversity doth best discover virtue." Essay of Adversity

Comp. : "Though the camomile, the more it is trodden on the faster it grows, yet youth, the more it is wasted the sooner it wears."1 Henry IV. ii. 4.

"A wretched soul bruised in adversity." Comedy of Errors ii. 1

Blanche : "The Lady Constance speaks not from her faith,
But from her need."

Const. : "O! If thou grant my need,
Which only lives but by the death of faith,
That need must needs infer this principle
That faith should live again by death of need:
O! then, tread down my need, and faith mounts up;
THOU saw'st them when I had prosperity
Keep my need up, and faith is trodden down."
King John iii. 1

The following are examples of the many ways in which Bacon, by antithesis,
combines jest and satire as to produce a sense of the comic whilst uttering a truth :

"Welcome the cup of sour prosperity! Affliction may one day smile again, and, till then, sit thee down, sorrow! Love's Labour's Lost i. 2

Alicib. : " I have heard in some sort of thy miseries."
Tim. : " Thous saw'st them when i had prosperity."
Alicib. : " I see them now; then was a blessed time."
Tim. : "As thine is now, held with a brace of harlots." Timon of Athens iv. 3

"I am thinking what I shall say.... It must be a personating of himself,: a satire against the softness of prosperity , with a discovery of the infiinite flatteries that follow youth and opulency."Timon of Athens v. 1