Index

for

Bacon VS Shakespeare

by

Edwin Reed

 

ABBOT, EDWIN A., his introduction to Mrs. Pott's edition of the Promus, 54, 55; on Bacon's inaccuracies,137; Bacon's private character, 181.

Absque hoc, a species of traverse known to Shake-speare, 8.

ADDISON, JOSEPH, on Bacon's intellectual powers, 46-48; Shake-speare's literary style, 120; Bacon's servants, 177; Bacon's private character, 181.

ADONIS, GARDENS OF, 214.

ADVANCEMENT OF LEARNING, a curious typographical mistake in, 115.

ÆSCHYLUS, likeness of Clytemnestra to Lady Macbeth, 2, 3.

ALLGEMEINE ZEITUNG, on reason's for Bacon's concealment of authorship of Shake-speare, 126.

ALLIBONE, S. A., on extent of Shake-speare's knowledge, 9, 10; on Stephen Gosson, 49.

ALPHABET, works of the, mysterious references to, 51.

Amores, Ovid's, quotation from, in 'Venus and Adonis,' 15.

ANACHRONISMS in Shake-speare, 129-134; in Bacon, 134-137.

APOTHEGMS, Bacon's, errors in, 135-137.

ARBER, EDWARD, his edition of Bacon's Essays, 86.

ARISTOTLE, quoted in error by Bacon and Shake-speare, 129.

ARNOLD, MATTHEW, on Shakspere self-school'd, 12.

ASTROLOGY, believed in by Bacon and Shake-speare, 251

ATHENÆUM, the (London), on Shakspere's indifference to literary fame, 36; Shake-speare's knowledge of Italian scenes and customs, 215.

AUBREY, JOHN, on Bacon as a concealed poet, 85; various estimates of, 85.

AULD ROBIN GRAY, concealed authorship of, 127.

 

BACON, LADY ANNE, culture of, 48; chides her sons on account of their fondness for the drama, 88; insanity of, 236.

BACON, ANTHONY, his strong dramatic tastes, 142; rescues Francis from prison, 87; commemorated in 'Merchant of Venice,' 87; opposed to Lord Burleigh, 206.

 

283

BACON, DELIA, the first to reveal true authorship of Shake-speare, 108; on Bacon's philanthropic spirit,182.

BACON, FRANCIS, name, 12; alleged indifference to fame as a dramatist, 36, 124, 129; intellectual greatness, 44-48; parentage, 48; political ambition, 48, 49; secret connection with the stage, 50; enigmatical correspondence with Sir Toby Matthew, 51, 52; Promus, 53-57; parallelisms, 57-80; love and knowledge of flowers, 80-82; Northumberland MSS., 82-84; calls himself a "concealed poet," 85, 282; so called by Aubrey, 85; intimacy with Florio, 85; probable secret author of a sonnet commended by Florio, 86; acquainted with Montaigne's Essays, 86; want of employment, 87-88; imprisoned for debt, 87; released by his brother Anthony, 87; chided by his mother on account of his dramatic tastes, 88; his "working fancy," 88; becomes intimate with Ben Jonson, 104; fills all numbers, 106; his History of Henry VII., filling the gap in the historical series of plays, 108, 109; in private life and at leisure when the plays are first collected and published, 112; careless of the printing of his works, 115; 'Timon of Athens' and 'Henry VIII.' autobiographical, 116, 117; alludes to certain writings as works of recreation, which, if acknowledged, might make him more famous, 127; errors in his writings, 129-137; his Essay on Love, containing sentiments similar to Shake-speare's, 138-140; his practical knowledge of dramatic art, 141, 142; the 'Misfortunes of Arthur,' 142; recommends that dramatic art be taught in schools, 143; knowledge of localities in Warwickshire, 145, 146; dark period in his life, 157; his acknowledged poetry, 159; translations of the Psalms, 160, 161; translation of a Greek epigram, 165, 166; chancellor of Mt. Parnassus, 167; writes to Essex that the waters of Parnassus are quenching his thirst for office, 168; the poetical character of his prose, 169-172; admitted by Spedding to have had all the capabilities of a great poet, 171, 172; his treatment of Essex, 174; bribery charges, 175-178; his indifference to money, 175; his servants, 176; testimony of contemporaries to his private character, 178; of his biographers and critics, 181-183; extent of his vocabulary, 184; various styles of writing, 187-195; use of the phrase, "I cannot tell," 195-198; familiarity with hunting and hawking, 203; constantly making alterations in his writings, 203, 204; educated at Cambridge, and familiar with local dialect, 204, 205; caricatures Sir John Oldcastle as Falstaff, and Lord Burleigh as Polonius, 205-211; refers to Sir Edward Coke in 'Twelfth Night,' 212; plagiarisms, 212; familiar with story of Cymbeline, 213; fond of punning, 213; classical lore in his writings, 214, 215; sojourn on the Continent, 215; familiar with courts and court etiquette, 223; cipher-writing, 223, 224; singular

 284

use of the word weed, 224; character of his philosophy, 225-229; knowledge of history, 229, 230; of law, 230; of medicine, 235, 236; of natural history, 237, 244; his religion, 244, 245; his definition of poetry, 246, 247; knowledge of musical science, 247-249; an orator, 249; fondness for emblems, 252; summary of his life, 281, 282.

BALTIMORE SUN, correspondent of, on Shake-speare's knowledge of Italian scenes and customs, 216, 218.

BARTON-ON-THE-HEATH, 146.

BAYNES, T. S., on Shake-speare's knowledge of Latin, 2, 15; of Italian, 4; of French, 5; of classics, 6; extent and variety of Shake-speare's knowledge, 9.

BEAUMONT, FRANCIS, his graceful tribute to Bacon, 178.

BED OF WARE, 212.

BEES in Shake-speare, 241-243.

BETTERTON, THOMAS, his visit to Stratford, 267.

BILLIARDS, known to the ancients, 133.

BOENER, PETER, his testimony to Bacon's private character, 178.

BOHEMIA, sea-coast of, 94, 133.

BRIGHT, JOHN, his opinion of the authorship of 'Hamlet' and 'King Lear,' 278.

BROWNE, C. ELLIOT, social condition of Stratford in time of Shakspere, 19.

BURLEIGH, LORD, caricatured as Polonius, 205-211.

BUST of Shakspere, description of, 31, 32, 218.

BUTLER, BENJAMIN F., his opinion of the authorship of Shake-speare, 278.

BYRON, LORD, his doubts concerning authorship of Shake-speare, 118.

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY, dialect of, 205.

CAMPBELL, CHIEF JUSTICE, on Shake-speare's knowledge of law, 7, 231.

CAVENDISH, MARGARET, on the comparative literary merits of her husband and Shake-speare, 120.

CHAMBERLAIN, MELLEN, on Shake-speare's autograph in Boston Public Library, 13, 14.

CHAMBERS' EDINBURG JOURNAL, on Ben Jonson and Bacon's secret, 108.

CHELTENHAM, Bacon's estate in, 146.

CHETTLE, HENRY, his alleged commendation of Shakspere, 148, 150-153, 270.

CHURCH, RICHARD W., on Bacon's private character, 182; poetical nature of Bacon's philosophy, 229.

CIPHER-WRITING, Bacon's studies in, 223.

 

285

 

CLARKE, CHARLES and MARY COWDEN, their opinion that the author of the Shake-speare plays was educated at a university, 6; on Shake-speare's knowledge of law, 8.

COAT-ARMOR, John Shakspere's, 27, 28, 272.

COKE, SIR EDWARD, caricatured in 'Twelfth Night.' 211, 212.

COLERIDGE, SAMUEL TAYLOR, his opinion that Shake-speare had a scholastic education, 6; philosophy in Shake-speare, 9; incongruity between the life of Shakspere and the works of Shake-speare, 43; unique character of the Shake-speare plays, 154, 278.

COLLIER, J. P., on the 'Misfortunes of Arthur,' 142.

COMMON LANDS at Stratford, enclosure of, 28, 275.

COMPOSITE AUTHORSHIP, theory of, 153-155.

CONDELL, HENRY, associate editor of the first folio, 113, 148, 149.

Confessio Fraternitatis, concerning an imposture on the stage, 42.

CRAIK, GEORGE L., on extent of Shake-speare's vocabulary, 185; on mysterious nature of Bacon's eminence, 227.

CRISPINUS, a caricature of Shakspere, 94-100.

CUCKOO, in Shake-speare, 243.

CYMBELINE, story of, 212, 213.

 

D'ALEMBERT, on intellectual eminence of Francis Bacon, 47.

DAVENANT, SIR WILLIAM, re-writes Shake-speare's plays, 121; letter of King James I. to Shakspere, 273.

DAVIDSON, THOMAS, on the Shakspere coat-of-arms, 272; on the facts of Shakspere's life, 278.

DAVIES, JOHN, asked by Bacon to be "good to concealed poets," 85.

DAVIS, CUSHING K., on Shake-speare's knowledge of law, 8.

DEER in Shake-speare, 243.

DENHAM, SIR JOHN, testimony of, to Shakspere's illiteracy, 11.

DETHIC, SIR WILLIAM, charged with bribery in the matter of the Shakspere coat-of-arms, 28.

DIGGES, LEONARD, alleged testimony of, to Shakspere as the author of the plays, 148-150.

DIXON, HEPWORTH, descriptive sketches of Bacon, 141, 173, 174; on the bribery charges, 177; Bacon's philanthropy, 182.

DONNELLY, IGNATIUS, concerning portraits of Shakspere, 36; diction of Shake-speare, 99; triple forms of expression, 194.

DOVE, the, in Shake-speare, 243.

DOWDALL, JOHN, his visit to Stratford, 11.

DOWDEN, EDWARD, on Shake-speare's admiration of men of action, 139; the dark period in Shakspere's life, 155-158.

DOYLE, JOHN P., on trial scene in 'Merchant of Venice,' 232-235.

DRAPER, JOHN W., on character of Bacon's system of philosophy, 228.

 

286

 

DROESHOUT ENGRAVING, the, 35.

DRYDEN, JOHN, on Shakspere's illiteracy, 11, 12; his criticism of the plays, 120; re-writes the 'Tempest,'121.

 

EDINBURG REVIEW, on Bacon's jest-book, 138.

ELZE, KARL, on Shake-speare's knowledge of French, 4, 5; of Spanish, 5; of Italian scenes and customs, 216; of Romano as a sculptor, 219.

EMERSON, RALPH WALDO, on Shake-speare's wisdom, 8; greatness of Shake-speare unrecognized by contemporaries, 23; incongruity between life of Shakspere and works ascribed to him, 43, 158.

ERDMANN, JOHANN E., on Bacon's treatment of Essex, 174.

ERRORS AND ANACHRONISMS, in Bacon and Shake-speare, 129-137.

ESSEX, EARL OF, treason of, 119; opposes Bacon, 146; prosecuted by Bacon, 174.

 

FARMER, RICHARD, on Shake-speare's knowledge of foreign languages, 215.

FEARON, FRANCIS, on Bacon's correspondence with Sir Toby Matthew, 51.

FEIS, JACOB, on Crispinus as a caricature of Shakspere, 100.

FIELD, B. RUSH, on Shake-speare's medical knowledge, 236.

FLEAY, FREDERIC GARD, on alleged apology of Chettle to Shakspere, 152.

FLORIO, JOHN, remarks on a concealed poet, 85, 86.

FLOWERS, parallel lists of, 80-82.

FOLIO, FIRST, contents of, 111; compared with quartos, 112, 114; printing and pagination, 115.

FORGERIES, IRELAND'S, 123, 124.

FREEMASONRY, in Shake-speare, 263.

FRENCH, Shake-speare's knowledge of, 4.

FRISWELL, JAMES H., opinion of Shakspere's bust at Stratford, 32; of new portrait, 35.

FULLER, THOMAS, testimony of, concerning Shakspere's illiteracy, 11; universality of Bacon's genius, 169.

FURNESS, WILLIAM H., unable to harmonize the facts of Shakspere's life with the writings ascribed to him, 155.

 

GALILEO, his theory of the tides, 128.

GARRICK, DAVID, his description of Stratford, 19; use of Shake-speare text, 128.

GERVINUS, G. G., on Shake-speare's knowledge of Latin, 2; of Italian, 4; of other foreign languages, 5; of the classics, 6; on Shakespeare's treatment of love, 140; similar combination of mental powers in Bacon and Shake-speare,

GIBBON, EDWARD, on Shake-speare, 228.

GIFFORD, WILLIAM, his defence of Ben Jonson, 92; on Shakspere's alleged assistance to Ben Jonson, 93.

GLADSTONE, WILLIAM E., on the bribery charges, 177, 178.

GOETHE, WILHELM VON, anachronisms of, 133; use of translations, 215.

GOOD-DAWNING, salutation in 'Lear' and the Promus, 55.

GOSSON, STEPHEN, opinion of theatres, 49.

GRAMMAR SCHOOL at Stratford, character of, 16, 19, 267.

GRANVILLE, GEORGE, re-writes 'Merchant of Venice,' 121.

GRAVE-DIGGERS' SCENE in 'Hamlet,' origin of, 4.

GREEN, HENRY, emblems in heraldry, 255.

GREENE, ROBERT, his character, 38 n.; on Shakspere's illiteracy, 12; personal hostility to Shakspere, 41, 150, 151.

GUTHRIE, WILLIAM, on Bacon's servants, 177.

 

HALL, JOHN, his professional acquirements, 236; expelled from Corporation of Stratford, 276.

HALLAM, HENRY, on Bacon's genius, 47.

HALLIWELL-PHILLIPPS, J. O., on curriculum of Stratford Grammar school, 15; sanitary condition of Stratford, 19; John Shakspere's application for coat-armor, 27, 28; on enclosure of common lands at Stratford, 28; the Stratford bust, 32; new portrait of Shakspere, 35; play-acting and play-writing in time of Shakspere, 51; the Shake-speare text, 124.

'HAMLET,' date of, 20 n.

HART, JOSEPH C., early doubt of, concerning authorship of Shake-speare, 118.

HART, JOSEPH S., on Shakspere's bust at Stratford, 32.

HARVEY, GABRIEL, on authorship of the early 'Hamlet,' 20.

HARVEY, WILLIAM, unnoticed by Bacon, 227.

HATHAWAY, ANNE, her cottage, 268; bequest from her husband, 265, 276.

HAWKINS, SIR JOHN, on Bacon's knowledge of the theory of music, 247.

HEARD, FRANKLIN FISKE, on Shake-speare's knowledge of law, 8.

HEAT, similar conceptions of, in Bacon and Shake-speare, 129.

HEMINGE, JOHN, associate editor of the first folio, 113, 148.

'HENRY VI.' play of, enlarged for the folio, 112.

HENRY VII., Reign of, omitted in the historical series of the Shake-speare dramas, 108, 109.

HENRY VIII., play of, its autobiographical character, 116, 117.

HERALDRY, in 'Pericles,' 252-261.

HEYWOOD, THOMAS, his personal reference to Shakspere, 38.

HILLIARD, NICHOLAS, his portrait of Bacon, 92.

HOLMES, NATHANIEL, on Shake-speare's knowledge of the classics, 5; his work on the Authorship of

Shake-speare, 7; parallelisms, 79; cover of Northumberland MSS., 82, 83.

HOLMES, OLIVER WENDELL, on the Baconian theory, 278.

HONORIFICABILITUDINITATIBUS, 60, 83.

HOWES, EDMUND, on Francis Bacon as a poet, 167.

HUDSON, H. N., on Falstaff as a philosopher, 9.

HUNTER, JOSEPH, on classical lore in Shake-speare, 215.

 

INGLEBY, CLEMENT M., on position of Shake-speare among his contemporaries, 23, 24; Droeshout engraving, 35; play-acting and play-writing in time of Shake-speare, 51; Ben Jonson's criticism of the 'Tempest,' 101; testimony of contemporaries, 148.

IRELAND, SAMUEL, makes first mention of Anne Hathaway's Cottage, 268.

IRELAND, WILLIAM HENRY, Shakespeare forgeries of, 123, 124.

ISLE OF DOGS, Nash's, 82, 83.

ITALIAN LANGUAGE, Shake-speare's knowledge of, 3.

 

JAMES I., KING, his letter to Shakspere, 273.

JEST-BOOK, Bacon's, 138.

JOHNSON, SAMUEL, on wisdom in Shake-speare, 9; his criticism of the plays, 120.

JONSON, BEN, his relations to Bacon, 91, 104, 105; verses commendatory of Droeshout engraving, 91; enmity to Shakspere, 92-101; eulogy on Shake-speare, 101, 102; on Bacon's private character,178.

JUNIUS, letters of, 127.

 

KHUNRATH, HEINRICH, concerning an alleged imposture on the stage, 42.

KILL-COW CONCEIT, definition of, 40.

KNIGHT, CHARLES, finds traces of Shake-speare in 'Antigone' of Sophocles, 5; on Shake-speare'sknowledge of classical antiquity, 6; on Shake-speare's retirement to Stratford and termination of literary career in middle life, 24; Troilus and Cressida, 110; on the Ireland forgeries, 124; Shake-speare's knowledge of Italian scenes and customs, 216.

 

LANDOR, WALTER SAVAGE, his estimate of Bacon's genius, 48; on Milton's verses to Shake-speare, 122.

LANG, ANDREW, on Shake-speare's commendation of Giulio Romano as a sculptor, 219.

 

289

LANGLIN, J. N., on Warwickshire provincialisms in Shake-speare, 147.

LATIN LANGUAGE, Shake-speare's knowledge of, 1-3.

LARK, the, in Shake-speare, 240.

LAW, Shake-speare's knowledge of, 7, 8, 230-235; study of, for the "merry tales," 56.

LESSING, G. E., on rules of drama relating to anachronisms, 133, 134; unique character of the plays, 154.

LIEBIG, BARON, his opinion of Bacon as a philosopher, 227.

LODGE, THOMAS, his connection with Robert Greene, 152.

LOWELL, JAMES RUSSELL, on Shake-speare's knowledge of the Greek drama, 3; extent of Shake-speare's knowledge, 9; Shakspere's retirement to Stratford in middle life and occupation there, 24; indifference to fame, 36; Shake-speare, an apparition, 44; philosophy of war, 68; unique character of the plays, 154; his opinion of Ulrici, 157; Shake-speare's genius, 159; classical lore in Shakespeare, 215; Shakspere's parentage, 266.

LYTTON, SIR EDWARD BULWER, on Bacon as a poet, 171.

 

MACAULAY, T. B., on Bacon's intellect, 44, 173; Bacon's fame, 183.

MAGINN, WILLIAM, on Shake-speare's knowledge of foreign languages, 215.

MALONE, EDMUND, finds traces of Shake-speare in Latin authors, 5; on Shake-speare's knowledge of law,8.

MANCHESTER, REV. L. C., metrical extracts from Bacon and Shake-speare compared, 200.

MANNINGHAM, JOHN, his personal reference to Shakspere, 38.

MARLOWE, CHRISTOPHER, origin of English blank verse for the drama, 40; Chettle's apology to, 151, 152.

MARSTON, JOHN, caricatured by Ben Jonson, 97-99.

MASSEY, GERALD, on Shake-speare's knowledge of law, 231.

MASSON, DAVID, his opinion of Milton's sonnet to Shake-speare, 122; criticism on his life of Milton, 269.

MATTHEW, THOMAS, fictitious name on the title-page of a Bible, 36.

MEDICINE, knowledge of, possessed by Bacon and Shake-speare, 235, 236.

MEDWIN, THOMAS, conversations with Lord Byron, 118.

'MERCHANT OF VENICE,' Italian character of, 4; possible origin, 87; trial scene in, 232-235.

MERMAID CLUB, founded by Sir Walter Raleigh, 273.

'MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR,' enlarged for the folio, 112.

'MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM,' Greek source of Helena's lament in, 2.

MILTON, JOHN, his allusions to Shake-speare, 122; his translation of the Psalms, 162, 163; extent of his vocabulary, 280.

 

290

 

MINTO, WILLIAM, on Bacon's inaccuracies, 137.

MISFORTUNES OF ARTHUR, the, 142.

MONEY, relative value of, 23; the "muck of the world," 202.

MONTAGU, BASIL, on Bacon's temperament, 47; treatment of servants, 176, 177.

MONTAIGNE, MICHEL, known to Bacon, 86; quoted in the 'Tempest,' 86; Shakspere's alleged autograph in copy of Florio's translation of his Essays, 86.

MORGAN, APPLETON, on Stratford Grammar School, 16, 19; his own position on the question of the authorship of Shake-speare, 19; Droeshout engraving, 35; no claim made to the plays by or for Shakspere, 36; on Sir Toby Matthew's postscript, 53; parallelisms, 80; early critics of Shakespeare, 119; translations of the Psalms by Bacon and Milton compared, 161, 162; Shake-speare an aristocrat, 223; nonpareil type, 250.

MORLEY, HENRY, on John Shakspere's application for coat-armor, 272.

MUSIC, art of, 247-249.

 

NAIL ILLUSTRATION, common to Bacon and Shake-speare, 129, 130.

NASH, THOMAS, his allusion to the early 'Hamlet,' 20 n.; denounces Shakspere as an idiot, 37-40; 'Isle of Dogs,' 82.

NATURAL HISTORY, treatment of, by Bacon and Shake-speare, 237-244.

NAVIGATION, art of, 251, 252.

NEWMAN, FRANCIS W., on the authorship of the Tragedies, 36, 122, 123.

NICHOL, JOHN, on a remarkable parallelism, 61; Bacon's inaccuracies, 137; Bacon's private character, 181.

NICHOLSON, BRINSLEY, on Ben Jonson's relations to Shakspere, 100.

NORRIS, J. P., his opinion of the Shakspere Bust at Stratford, 32; of the Droeshout engraving, 35.

NORTHUMBERLAND MSS., 82-84.

NOVUM ORGANUM, frontispiece of, 252.

 

O'CONNER, WILLIAM, on Shake-speare's knowledge of classics, 6; Shakspere's will, 31; Shakspere's character, 278.

OLDCASTLE, SIR JOHN, caricatured as Falstaff, 205.

OLDYS, WILLIAM, on alleged letter of King James to Shakspere, 273.

ORATORY, 249, 250.

OSBORNE, FRANCIS, on Bacon's familiarity with hunting and hawking, 203.

OTWAY, THOMAS, purloins from 'Romeo and Juliet,' 120.

'OUR ENGLISH HOMER,' 2.

'OTHELLO,' source of, 4; Macaulay's opinion of it, 20; emendations for the folio, 113.

OVID, source of 'Venus and Adonis,' 2; Amores, 15.

 

291

 

PAGINATION of first folio, 115.

PARALLELISMS between Bacon and Shake-speare, 57-80; between Shake-speare and Montaigne, 86.

PARKMAN, FRANCIS, offers an objection to the Baconian theory, 137.

PARMENIDES, author of the phrase "to be or not to be," 69.

PEARSON, CHARLES H., on philosophy of war, 68; Dryden's estimate of Shake-speare, 121, 122.

'PERICLES,' play of, shows knowledge of heraldry, 252-261.

PEPYS, SAMUEL, his opinion of the Shake-speare plays, 119.

PHILOSOPHY, Shake-speare's knowledge of, 8, 228.

PITT, WILLIAM, uncontrolled extravagance of his servants, 175.

PLAGIARISMS of Bacon and Shake-speare, 212.

PLAUTUS, his Menaechmi the source of 'Comedy of Errors,' 2.

PLAY-ACTORS, social position of, in time of Shake-speare, 49-51.

PLAYWRIGHTS, social position of, in time of Shake-speare, 49-51.

PLINY'S Epistle to Vespasian, 113.

PLOWDEN'S French Commentaries, when translated, 4.

PLUTARCH, source of 'Timon of Athens,' 2.

POET-APE, Ben Jonson's epigram to, 41, 42.

POETASTER, the, Ben Jonson's, 94-100.

POETRY, Bacon's acknowledged, 159-167.

POLONIUS, a caricature of Lord Burleigh, 205-211.

POPE, ALEXANDER, finds traces of Shake-speare in Dares Phrygius, 5; illiteracy of Shakspere, 12; Bacon's genius, 44; Shake-speare's object in life, 144.

PORTRAITS of Shakspere, 31-35; number of, 35, 36.

POSTSCRIPT, Sir Toby Matthew's, 51, 52.

POTT, MRS. CONSTANCE M., on Shake-speare's "works of the alphabet," 51; Promus, 53, 57; 'Misfortunes of Arthur,' 142; Warwickshire provincialisms in Shake-speare, 147, 148.

PRINTING, art of, 250, 251.

PROMUS, Bacon's, 53-57; salutatory phrases, 54; colloquialisms, 55, 56; proverbs, 56; parallelisms, 70-76.

PROVERBS, in Bacon's Promus, 56; in Bacon and Shake-speare, 219, 220.

PROVINCIALISMS, 16, 145.

PSALMS, Bacon's translations of, 160-162; Milton's, 162, 163.

PUNS, in writings of Bacon and Shake-speare, 213.

 

QUARTERLY REVIEW, on Shake-speare's fine contempt for details, 137; natural history, 239-244.

QUEVEDO, FRANCISCO DE, supposed allusion to, in Matthew's postscript, 52.

QUINEY, THOMAS, liquor-dealer, fined by town of Stratford, 275.

 

292

 

RALEIGH, SIR WALTER, our knowledge of his powers of repartee, 213, 214; founder of the Mermaid Club, 273.

RATSIE'S GHOST, personal allusion in, to Shakspere, 41.

RAWLEY, WILLIAM, his testimony to Bacon's versatility, 169; Bacon's private character, 178.

READE, CHARLES, on the Ireland forgeries, 124.

RELIGION of Bacon and Shake-speare, 244-246.

RÉMUSAT, M. DE, on Bacon's intuitions, 229; refusal of Academy of Florence to admit Bacon to membership, 244, 245.

'RETURN FROM PARNASSUS,' personal allusion in, to Shakspere, 41.

'RICHARD II.,' treasonable use of play of, by Earl of Essex, 118.

ROMANO, GIULIO, a sculptor, 218, 219.

'ROMEO AND JULIET,' Italian character of, 4; Promus entries in, 53, 54, 76.

ROWE, NICHOLAS, his biography of Shakspere, 267.

ROYAL SOCIETY, founded by Bacon, 244.

RYMER, THOMAS, his opinion of 'Othello,' 122-124.

 

SALUTATIONS in the Promus, 54.

SATURDAY REVIEW, on Shake-speare's commendations of Giulio Romano as a sculptor, 219.

SCHLEGEL, A. W. VON, on incongruity between Shakspere's life and the writings ascribed to him, 43; unique character of Shake-speare's works, 154.

SCOTT, SIR WALTER, concealment of his authorship of the Waverley novels, 88, 127; anachronisms, 134.

SEA OF TROUBLES, meaning of, 65.

SENSE WITHOUT MOTION, meaning of, 66.

SHAKE-SPEARE, WILLIAM, the dramatist, attainments of, 1-10; knowledge of Latin, 2; of Greek, 3, 4; of Italian, 3, 4; of French, 4; of Spanish, 5; of ancient and modern literature, 5, 6, 230; of law, 7, 8, 56, 230-235; of philosophy, 8, 228; extent of knowledge, 9, 10; origin of pseudonym, 13, 14;greatness unrecognized by contemporaries, 23, 24; by critics of succeeding generations, 119-124;first appreciated by Lessing, 134; sentiments on love, 138-141; doggerel in, 164; invention ofwords, 184; extent of vocabulary, 185; words of Latin origin, 185-187; literary style compared with Bacon's, 188, 189; impetuosity of style, 191; triple forms of expression, 193, 194; use of phrase, "I cannot tell," 196-198; promiscuous examples of style, prose and verse, 198-201; remote analogies, 203; frequent alterations in the plays, 204; educated at Cambridge, 204, 205; plagiarisms, 212; punning on Bacon's name in the 'Merry Wives of Windsor,' 213; classical lore, 214; foreign travel, 215; proverbs, 220, 221; knowledge of court etiquette, 223; an aristocrat, 223; singular use of the word weed, 224; knowledge of history, 229, 230; of medicine, 235, 236; of natural history, 237-244; his religion, 245, 246; knowledge of musical science, 247-249; an orator, 249; printing, 250; astrology, 251; familiar with the writings of the emblematists, 255-261; witchcraft, 261; freemasonry, 263.

SHAKSPERE, HAMNET, birth of, 268; death, 271.

SHAKSPERE, JOHN, fined by town of Stratford for filthy habits, 15, 16; reputed an esquire, 41; coat-armor, 27, 28, 98, 272; death, 100 n.

SHAKSPERE, JUDITH, illiteracy of, 11; arraigned before court at Worcester, 275.

SHAKSPERE, SUSANNA, illiteracy of, 11; brings suit against John Lane for slander, 274; could not recognize her husband's MSS., 276.

SHAKSPERE, WILLIAM, his surname, 1, 12-14; illiteracy of, 11, 12; chirography, 14, 15; epistolary correspondence, 14; departure from Stratford, 19, 20; unknown in literary and social circles in London, 23; income, 23; retirement to Stratford, 24; indifference to literary fame, 24, 27; occupation as a brewer, 24, 272; litigious, 27; applies for coat-armor for his father, 27; favors enclosures of common lands at Stratford, 28; inscription on his gravestone, 28; buried in the chancel of the church, 28; his will, 31; his bust, 31; Droeshout engraving, 35, 91; new Stratford portrait, 35; no claim made by him or for him to the plays, 36; personal references to him by contemporaries, 37-43; by Thomas Nash, 37-40; by Robert Greene, 41; by Ben Jonson, 41, 42; no dark period in his life, 155-157; incongruity between his life and his writings, 43, 158, 159; no evidence that he ever visited the Continent, 219; his parentage, 266, 267; deer-stealing tradition, 269; lameness, 270; summary of the facts of his life, 277.

SHAW, THOMAS B., on Shakspere's illiteracy, 12.

SHELLEY, PERCY BYSSHE, on Bacon as a poet, 170.

SIDNEY, SIR PHILIP, on the state of the theatre in the time of Shake-speare, 133.

SIMPSON, RICHARD, on contemporary allusions to Shakspere, 39, 41.

SMITH, GOLDWIN, concerning Bacon's Essay on Love, and 'Romeo and Juliet,' 138.

SMITH, WILLIAM H., an early Baconian, 108, 109.

SONNET XLVI., 7.

SPANISH LANGUAGE, Shake-speare's knowledge of, 5.

SPEDDING, JAMES, on Bacon's capabilities as a poet, 167, 171, 172; on Bacon's private character, 181; on a mental defect in Bacon, 227, 228.

STANDARD, the (London), on parallelisms between Bacon and Shake-speare, 79, 80.

STAPFER, PAUL, on Shake-speare's knowledge of Latin, 2; commendation of Gervinus, 2; his opinion of Shake-speare's learning, 6, 9.

 

294

 

STAUNTON, HOWARD, on Chettle's apology, 153.

STEEVENS, GEORGE, his opinion of the Shake-speare sonnets, 122.

STRATFORD-UPON-AVON, illiteracy of the people of, 15; condition of its streets, 15, 16; social character, 19; dramatic performances prohibited, 37.

SWINBURNE, ALGERNON C., on soliloquies in 'Hamlet,' 113; successive changes in the text of 'Hamlet,' 204.

SWING, DAVID, on the Baconian theory, 155.

 

TAINE, H. A., genius of Francis Bacon, 48; description of the theatre in Bacon's time, 50; poetic character of Bacon's prose, 169; Bacon's mind intuitional, 229.

TATE, NAHUM, his opinion of 'King Lear,' 119.

TAVENER, J. W., minor points of resemblance in the writings of Bacon and Shake-speare, 169.

TENNYSON, ALFRED, criticised by 'Christopher North,' 119.

THEATRE, the, character of, in Shake-speare's time, 49-51.

THEOBALD, ROBERT M., on colloquialisms in the Promus, 57; Northumberland MSS., 83; identical sentiments on the passion of love in Bacon and Shake-speare, 139; the alleged dark period in Shakspere's life, 157, 158; character of Bacon's prose, 170.

'TIMON OF ATHENS,' autobiographical character of, 116.

'TROILUS AND CRESSIDA,' preface to, 109, 110; prologue, 112.

TWICKENHAM, Bacon's residence at, 168.

 

ULRICI, HERMANN, on the play of 'Timon of Athens,' 117; on Shakspere's dark period, 156, 157; on Shake-speare's knowledge of musical science, 248.

 

VASARI refers to Giulio Romano as a sculptor, 218, 219.

VENICE, local knowledge of, in the plays, 215-218.

'VENUS AND ADONIS,' source of, 2; date, 15, 269; scholarly nature, 15, 16; where written, 16; dedication to Earl of Southampton, 271.

VERPLANCK, G. C., on source of 'Comedy of Errors,' 2.

VOCABULARY, extent of Bacon's, 184; of Shake-speare's, 185, 280, 281.

 

WALTER, JAMES, his True Life of Shakspere, 201.

WAR, Shake-speare's philosophy of, 68.

WARWICKSHIRE, dialect of, 145-148.

WATTS, T., on the metre of the Sonnets, 201.

WAVERLEY NOVELS, the, concealed authorship of, 88, 89, 127.

WEED, singular use of the word by Bacon and Shake-speare, 224.

 

295

 

WELSH, ALFRED H., on Bacon's literary style, 47.

WEIS, JOHN, on parallelisms in Bacon and Shake-speare, 79.

WHIPPLE, EDWIN P., on incongruity between Shakspere's life and his writings, 43; poetic character of Bacon's prose, 171; Bacon's philanthropy, 182.

WHITE, RICHARD GRANT, on Shake-speare's knowledge of Latin, 2; of Greek, 3; of Italian, 4; of French, 5; finds traces of Shake-speare in Alcestis of Euripides, 5; Shake-speare's academic studies, 6; wisdom in 'Troilus and Cressida,' 6; Shake-speare's knowledge of law, 7, 231; illiteracy, 12; condition of Stratford streets, 19; tragedy of 'King Lear,' 20; Shakspere's social position in London, 23; pitiless biographers of Shakspere, 27; bust, 32; Droeshout engraving, 35; a "miraculous miracle," 43; Promus, 57; plagiarism from Montaigne in 'Tempest,' 86; Shake- speare's motives as a writer, 144, 145; doggerel in Shake-speare, 164.

WHITE, THOMAS W., on false Latin in 'Love's Labor's Lost,' 2; on Shake-speare's insensibility to the gross passion of love, 140, 141.

WHITTIER, JOHN G., on the authorship of Shake-speare, 278.

WIGSTON, W. F. C., on Freemasonry in Shake-speare, 263.

WINSTANLEY, WILLIAM, on illiteracy of Shakspere, 11.

'WINTER'S TALE,' the, criticised by Ben Jonson, 94; statue of Hermione, 218, 219.

WISE, JOHN R., on Warwickshire provincialisms, 147; ideal Shake-speare, 266.

WIT, BACON'S, 137.

WITCHCRAFT, in Bacon and Shake-speare, 261-263.

WITHERS, GEORGE, on Bacon as a poet, 167.

WORDSWORTH, WILLIAM, rank of, 119; on pathetic character of 'Othello,' 156; Ode to Immortality, 165;Peter Bell, 165.

WYMAN, W. H., concerning the earliest doubts on authorship of Shake-speare, 118.

 

Return to Table of Contents of Bacon vs Shakspere

 

I. THE AUTHOR OF THE "SHAKE-SPEARE" PLAYS . . . . . 1

II. WILLIAM SHAKSPERE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

III. FRANCIS BACON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

IV. OBJECTIONS CONSIDERED . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

V. COINCIDENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184

VI. DISILLUSION, A GAIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264

VII. BIOGRAPHY OF SHAKSPERE IN FACT AND IN FICTION . . 266

VIII. SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280

INDEX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283

___________

LIST OF AUTHORS CONSULTED.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS